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TITLE
The Tominoul to Grantown Road
EXTERNAL ID
PC_GM_POSTCARDS_099
PLACENAME
Tomintoul
DISTRICT
Dufftown
SOURCE
Grantown Museum
ASSET ID
23346
KEYWORDS
postacrds
roads
moors
hills
trees
The Tominoul to Grantown Road

This postcard shows the Tomintoul to Grantown road. Tomintoul is located approximately 22 km southwest of Grantown on Spey. Both Tomintoul and Grantown are planned villages. Tomintoul was established in the 1770s by the local landowner, Alexander, fourth Duke of Gordon. Grantown was established in 1765 by Sir James Grant.

Tomintoul are Grantown are two of approximately 150 planned villages that were established in Scotland between 1750 and 1850. Agricultural improvements that took place during the 18th century, especially the enclosure of farmland, meant that far fewer people were needed to work the land. This led to much social disruption, and many landowners in Scotland created planned villages as a way of promoting trade and industry in their area, and as a means of providing employment to those who had been forced to leave the land.


This image may be available to purchase.
For further information about purchasing and prices please email
Grantown Museum

For guidance on the use of images and other content, please see the Terms and Conditions page.
High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
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The Tominoul to Grantown Road

postacrds; roads; moors; hills; trees

Grantown Museum

Grantown Museum Photographic Collection

This postcard shows the Tomintoul to Grantown road. Tomintoul is located approximately 22 km southwest of Grantown on Spey. Both Tomintoul and Grantown are planned villages. Tomintoul was established in the 1770s by the local landowner, Alexander, fourth Duke of Gordon. Grantown was established in 1765 by Sir James Grant.<br /> <br /> Tomintoul are Grantown are two of approximately 150 planned villages that were established in Scotland between 1750 and 1850. Agricultural improvements that took place during the 18th century, especially the enclosure of farmland, meant that far fewer people were needed to work the land. This led to much social disruption, and many landowners in Scotland created planned villages as a way of promoting trade and industry in their area, and as a means of providing employment to those who had been forced to leave the land. <br /> <br /> <br /> This image may be available to purchase.<br /> For further information about purchasing and prices please email<br /> <a href="mailto: gosmuseum@btconnect.com">Grantown Museum</a>