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TITLE
Nine Views of Nairn, 1964
EXTERNAL ID
PC_GM_POSTCARDS_109
PLACENAME
Nairn
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
NAIRN: Nairn
DATE OF IMAGE
1964
PERIOD
1960s
SOURCE
Grantown Museum
ASSET ID
23355
KEYWORDS
royal burghs
holiday resorts
Nine Views of Nairn, 1964

This postcard dating from 1964 shows nine views of Nairn, a town located approximately 26 km northeast of Inverness. The High Street, Seabank Road, Dulsie Bridge, the River Nairn, the beach, the putting green, the links, and Cawdor Castle are all featured.

Nairn is a royal burgh situated on the southern shore of the Moray Firth, approximately 16 miles from Inverness. It was once known as Invernairn because of its position at the mouth of the River Nairn. Before the coming of the Inverness and Nairn Railway in 1855, Nairn was a market and farming town inland from the Fishertown, a fishing village probably settled by the Norse before 1000 AD.

In the 16th century Nairn had a mixture of Gaelic-speaking Highlanders and north east fisher folk, who spoke Scots or English. It is recorded that King James VI and I boasted that he had a town in Scotland so long that the people at one end of the street spoke a different language from those at the other end.

The most recent part of Nairn is the Victorian resort town which grew up around the existing Fishertown after the arrival of the railway. The town became a popular health spa due to the medicinal properties of the local sea water, the long sandy beaches and the sunny dry climate. Elegant Victorian villas and prestigious hotels were built to accommodate the growing number of visitors. Other facilities were also developed, including a promenade, a bandstand and two golf courses.


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Grantown Museum

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Nine Views of Nairn, 1964

NAIRN: Nairn

1960s

royal burghs; holiday resorts

Grantown Museum

Grantown Museum Photographic Collection

This postcard dating from 1964 shows nine views of Nairn, a town located approximately 26 km northeast of Inverness. The High Street, Seabank Road, Dulsie Bridge, the River Nairn, the beach, the putting green, the links, and Cawdor Castle are all featured. <br /> <br /> Nairn is a royal burgh situated on the southern shore of the Moray Firth, approximately 16 miles from Inverness. It was once known as Invernairn because of its position at the mouth of the River Nairn. Before the coming of the Inverness and Nairn Railway in 1855, Nairn was a market and farming town inland from the Fishertown, a fishing village probably settled by the Norse before 1000 AD. <br /> <br /> In the 16th century Nairn had a mixture of Gaelic-speaking Highlanders and north east fisher folk, who spoke Scots or English. It is recorded that King James VI and I boasted that he had a town in Scotland so long that the people at one end of the street spoke a different language from those at the other end.<br /> <br /> The most recent part of Nairn is the Victorian resort town which grew up around the existing Fishertown after the arrival of the railway. The town became a popular health spa due to the medicinal properties of the local sea water, the long sandy beaches and the sunny dry climate. Elegant Victorian villas and prestigious hotels were built to accommodate the growing number of visitors. Other facilities were also developed, including a promenade, a bandstand and two golf courses. <br /> <br /> <br /> This image may be available to purchase.<br /> For further information about purchasing and prices please email<br /> <a href="mailto: gosmuseum@btconnect.com">Grantown Museum</a>