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TITLE
Cattle being driven to the Stance Sale at Gerenish (Gerinish), South Uist
EXTERNAL ID
PC_HIGHLANDLIVESTOCK_001
PLACENAME
Gerinish
DISTRICT
South Uist
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: South Uist
PERIOD
1930s
SOURCE
Highland Livestock Heritage Society
ASSET ID
23456
KEYWORDS
livestock
cattle
Highland cattle
black cattle
Shorthorns
Cattle being driven to the Stance Sale at Gerenish (Gerinish), South Uist

This photograph shows cattle being driven to the stance sale at Gerenish (Gerinish), South Uist.

According to the New Statistical Account (1834-45) the main breed of cattle in South Uist was black cattle - small, hardy descendents from old Celtic oxen. In the middle of the eighteenth century a larger red/brown variant was introduced form Perthshire resulting in the instantly recognizable breed with its shaggy coat and big horns. The red/brown colour proved to be the dominant gene and is now the most common colour. Highland cattle thrive on the poor land and in the poor climate where no other breed could exist. They are known for their longevity, vitality and easy handling and they provide excellent meat which is lean, tender, low in fat and high in protein and iron. In the Western Isles and other parts of Western Scotland Highland cattle are sometimes called "Kyloes"

In the twentieth century breeders began crossing Shorthorns with Highland cattle and there may be hybrids among the cattle in this photograph. In the Third Statistical Account (1957) cattle in South Uist are described as chiefly Shorthorn and Highland crosses. Shorthorns from the north of England are one of the oldest recorded breeds. A calf reared on a cross Highland cow's milk yields more meat.

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High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
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Cattle being driven to the Stance Sale at Gerenish (Gerinish), South Uist

INVERNESS: South Uist

1930s

livestock; cattle; Highland cattle; black cattle; Shorthorns

Highland Livestock Heritage Society

Highland Livestock Heritage Society photographs

This photograph shows cattle being driven to the stance sale at Gerenish (Gerinish), South Uist.<br /> <br /> According to the New Statistical Account (1834-45) the main breed of cattle in South Uist was black cattle - small, hardy descendents from old Celtic oxen. In the middle of the eighteenth century a larger red/brown variant was introduced form Perthshire resulting in the instantly recognizable breed with its shaggy coat and big horns. The red/brown colour proved to be the dominant gene and is now the most common colour. Highland cattle thrive on the poor land and in the poor climate where no other breed could exist. They are known for their longevity, vitality and easy handling and they provide excellent meat which is lean, tender, low in fat and high in protein and iron. In the Western Isles and other parts of Western Scotland Highland cattle are sometimes called "Kyloes"<br /> <br /> In the twentieth century breeders began crossing Shorthorns with Highland cattle and there may be hybrids among the cattle in this photograph. In the Third Statistical Account (1957) cattle in South Uist are described as chiefly Shorthorn and Highland crosses. Shorthorns from the north of England are one of the oldest recorded breeds. A calf reared on a cross Highland cow's milk yields more meat.