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TITLE
Ewe Lambs, Dingwall High Street, 1950s
EXTERNAL ID
PC_HIGHLANDLIVESTOCK_004
PLACENAME
Dingwall
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Dingwall
PERIOD
1950s
SOURCE
Highland Livestock Heritage Society
ASSET ID
23459
KEYWORDS
livestock
sheep
woollen industry
marts
agricultural improvement
agricultural improvers
Ewe Lambs, Dingwall High Street, 1950s

This photograph shows ewe lambs being driven down Dingwall High Street. Blackface sheep are the most common breed in the Highlands but the sheep in this photograph are probably North Country Cheviots.

This breed was introduced to the Highlands by Sir John Sinclair of Ulbster, the noted 18th century agricultural improver who helped establish the British Wool Society in 1791. This measure was a response to the deteriorating quality of the sheep stock in Britain which had led to the woollen industry having to import most of its supplies from abroad.

Trials were carried out with many different breeds and the "long hill sheep" found on the Cheviot Hills which straddle the border between England and Scotland proved to be a useful breed. Sinclair took 500 of these animals to his estate in Caithness and had such success with them that many thousands were bought by landowners.

In Dingwall in the 1950s, when this photograph was taken, auction marts for sheep and cattle were held every Wednesday, and sometimes on a Saturday, bringing crowds of farmers and country people to town. Dingwall has been and remains a key centre for the sale of this breed.

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Ewe Lambs, Dingwall High Street, 1950s

ROSS: Dingwall

1950s

livestock; sheep; woollen industry; marts; agricultural improvement; agricultural improvers

Highland Livestock Heritage Society

Highland Livestock Heritage Society photographs

This photograph shows ewe lambs being driven down Dingwall High Street. Blackface sheep are the most common breed in the Highlands but the sheep in this photograph are probably North Country Cheviots. <br /> <br /> This breed was introduced to the Highlands by Sir John Sinclair of Ulbster, the noted 18th century agricultural improver who helped establish the British Wool Society in 1791. This measure was a response to the deteriorating quality of the sheep stock in Britain which had led to the woollen industry having to import most of its supplies from abroad. <br /> <br /> Trials were carried out with many different breeds and the "long hill sheep" found on the Cheviot Hills which straddle the border between England and Scotland proved to be a useful breed. Sinclair took 500 of these animals to his estate in Caithness and had such success with them that many thousands were bought by landowners.<br /> <br /> In Dingwall in the 1950s, when this photograph was taken, auction marts for sheep and cattle were held every Wednesday, and sometimes on a Saturday, bringing crowds of farmers and country people to town. Dingwall has been and remains a key centre for the sale of this breed.