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TITLE
Corra-chriostag and The Plocadh
EXTERNAL ID
HC_GAELICSTORYTAPE_018
DATE OF RECORDING
1997
PERIOD
1990s
CREATOR
unknown
SOURCE
The Highland Council
ASSET ID
2353
KEYWORDS
oral tradition
folklore
stories
Gaelic
story telling
audio

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This story is recorded in Gaelic and the following is an English translation.

Corra-chriostag and The Plocach.

Long ago there lived Corra-chriostag and Plocach an Ruamhair. She was as lazy as could be and he was equally willing to work. She, Corra-chriostag, spent all her time visiting while the Plocach was out at work.

One day, the Plocach came home and said to Corra-chriostag: "Is it not time you were making tweed for me, Corra-chriostag?"

"Indeed I would do so," she replied, "if I had wool."

"Where is the wool that I took home last St Bride's Day?" said the Plocach. "It is in the holes in the wall," said she, "and if you wish me to make tweed for you, you take the wool out of the holes in the wall."

The Plocach found a small basket and he collected the wool out of the holes in the wall and put the basket down in front of her. Corra-chriostag put a little wreath of wool on the distaff and she spun a little clew of yarn and threw it up on to a shelf that was near the ceiling.

"Get up there," she said, "where the rest of your kind are." And off she went visiting.

Poor Plocach was getting really impatient about not hearing anything about the tweed. One day when he came home he said to Corra-chriostag: "Did the tweed ever go into the loom, Corra-chriostag?"

"I am going with it this very day," said she, "Up you get to that shelf up above and throw down to me the yarn which you will find up there."

Up he went, just as she had told him.

"All I can see here is one little clew," replied the Plocach.

"There's enough and to spare up there, then, and just you throw them down here to me," said she.

The Plocach threw down to her the one little clew that was there. Corra-chriostag threw the clew back up to him, behind him ... and they were at that game, back and fore, from me to you, until at last Corra-chriostag shouted, "The little basket is full, Plocach."

Corra-chriostag went off with the yarn in the basket to the weaver-wife's house.

Time was passing but there was no word or mention of the tweed and the Plocach was getting impatient at not getting it. One day he came home and said to Corra-chriostag, "Has the tweed been waulked yet, Corra-chriostag?"

"I took the tweed," she replied, "over to the bank of that loch over there and I shouted, 'Ravens and crows and seagulls, come here and waulk the tweed!' Not a raven or a crow or a seagull came. 'Whether you come or not,' said I, 'I am going in any case!' ... and I just left them to it."

"Dear me, dear me," said the Plocach, "what a sad state I'm in on your account! You never stopped until you sent me out to travel the world."

He took the basket and went off to travel the world. It wasn't long until he heard a little trotting pace behind him. When he had a look who should be there but her, herself, Corra-chriostag!

"Where do you think you're going, Corra-chriostag?" asked the Plocach.

"I'll be where you will be yourself," she replied.

"Did you pull the door behind you?" asked the Plocach.

"No, I did not," she replied.

"Go back, then," said he, "and pull the door behind you!"

She turned and went back home. It wasn't long until the Plocach heard a dragging and a commotion and a rumbling behind him. Who should this be but Corra-chriostag, dragging the door and the doorposts behind her!

"What's the meaning of this?" said the Plocach, "Did I not tell you to close the door? Leave them there, the door and the doorposts ... you cannot drag a burden of that kind with you."

"Where I am the door and the doorposts will be," answered Corra-chriostag. They set off, with Corra-chriostag dragging the door and the doorposts behind her.

At nightfall, did they not see a dim light on the floor of a glen and they made straight for it. Although they were far away from it they were not long in reaching it.

What was here but a cave full of robbers, with a large fire at its far end and a large pot on the fire and deer cooking in it.

Corra-chriostag took the door and the doorposts into the cave. Looking around she noticed that there were rafters at the top of the cave.

"Come on," she said to the Plocach, "we'll put the door up on the rafters."

Up went the door to the rafters, and the doorposts along with it. Then did Corra-chriostag not notice a small cup in a corner of the cave! She took up a cupful of the broth that was in the pot. She and the Plocach sat, one on either side of the fire, drinking sip about from the cup. They were not long doing that when a noise was heard outside. Who was this but the robbers, who had returned! Corra-chriostag and the Plocach were startled and they jumped up on the door on the rafters. In came the robbers, each one with a full load on his back. They poured out the bags of gold and silver on the floor and started to count all that they had stolen.

One of them went to the fire and started to prepare the supper. The smoke rose up around the rafters.

"I'm almost suffocated," said Corra-chriostag.

"Won't you be quiet?" said the Plocach to her.

"My eyes, my eyes, I'll lose my eyes with that smoke," said she.

"Won't you stay silent, Corra-chriostag?" said the Plocach, "in case they do away with us."

"Let's go and get a drink," said she.

"Don't say any more," said he, "or they will kill us without any doubt."

"Whether you come or not, I'm off," replied Corra-chriostag.

She moved to the lower end of the door. He did his best to keep her back. Down went the door carrying the two of them. They hit the pot that was on the fire, themselves and the door and the doorposts, all in a heap! A splash jumped out of the pot and hit the cook. He yelled blue murder.

Out went the robbers and made for the moor. The one who had been scalded crept away to the hill. The Plocach and Corra-chriostag filled the basket with the gold and silver and returned home to the cottage from which they had set off. They got a new door and doorposts and they were comfortable and happy there ever after.

This story is from a collection of stories available on tape, with an accompanying book, under the title 'Am Bloigh Beag le Beannachd'

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Corra-chriostag and The Plocadh

1990s

oral tradition; folklore; stories; Gaelic; story telling; audio

The Highland Council

Am Bloigh Beag le Beannachd (Cassette)

This story is recorded in Gaelic and the following is an English translation.<br /> <br /> Corra-chriostag and The Plocach.<br /> <br /> Long ago there lived Corra-chriostag and Plocach an Ruamhair. She was as lazy as could be and he was equally willing to work. She, Corra-chriostag, spent all her time visiting while the Plocach was out at work.<br /> <br /> One day, the Plocach came home and said to Corra-chriostag: "Is it not time you were making tweed for me, Corra-chriostag?"<br /> <br /> "Indeed I would do so," she replied, "if I had wool."<br /> <br /> "Where is the wool that I took home last St Bride's Day?" said the Plocach. "It is in the holes in the wall," said she, "and if you wish me to make tweed for you, you take the wool out of the holes in the wall."<br /> <br /> The Plocach found a small basket and he collected the wool out of the holes in the wall and put the basket down in front of her. Corra-chriostag put a little wreath of wool on the distaff and she spun a little clew of yarn and threw it up on to a shelf that was near the ceiling.<br /> <br /> "Get up there," she said, "where the rest of your kind are." And off she went visiting.<br /> <br /> Poor Plocach was getting really impatient about not hearing anything about the tweed. One day when he came home he said to Corra-chriostag: "Did the tweed ever go into the loom, Corra-chriostag?"<br /> <br /> "I am going with it this very day," said she, "Up you get to that shelf up above and throw down to me the yarn which you will find up there."<br /> <br /> Up he went, just as she had told him.<br /> <br /> "All I can see here is one little clew," replied the Plocach.<br /> <br /> "There's enough and to spare up there, then, and just you throw them down here to me," said she.<br /> <br /> The Plocach threw down to her the one little clew that was there. Corra-chriostag threw the clew back up to him, behind him ... and they were at that game, back and fore, from me to you, until at last Corra-chriostag shouted, "The little basket is full, Plocach."<br /> <br /> Corra-chriostag went off with the yarn in the basket to the weaver-wife's house.<br /> <br /> Time was passing but there was no word or mention of the tweed and the Plocach was getting impatient at not getting it. One day he came home and said to Corra-chriostag, "Has the tweed been waulked yet, Corra-chriostag?"<br /> <br /> "I took the tweed," she replied, "over to the bank of that loch over there and I shouted, 'Ravens and crows and seagulls, come here and waulk the tweed!' Not a raven or a crow or a seagull came. 'Whether you come or not,' said I, 'I am going in any case!' ... and I just left them to it."<br /> <br /> "Dear me, dear me," said the Plocach, "what a sad state I'm in on your account! You never stopped until you sent me out to travel the world."<br /> <br /> He took the basket and went off to travel the world. It wasn't long until he heard a little trotting pace behind him. When he had a look who should be there but her, herself, Corra-chriostag!<br /> <br /> "Where do you think you're going, Corra-chriostag?" asked the Plocach.<br /> <br /> "I'll be where you will be yourself," she replied.<br /> <br /> "Did you pull the door behind you?" asked the Plocach.<br /> <br /> "No, I did not," she replied.<br /> <br /> "Go back, then," said he, "and pull the door behind you!"<br /> <br /> She turned and went back home. It wasn't long until the Plocach heard a dragging and a commotion and a rumbling behind him. Who should this be but Corra-chriostag, dragging the door and the doorposts behind her!<br /> <br /> "What's the meaning of this?" said the Plocach, "Did I not tell you to close the door? Leave them there, the door and the doorposts ... you cannot drag a burden of that kind with you."<br /> <br /> "Where I am the door and the doorposts will be," answered Corra-chriostag. They set off, with Corra-chriostag dragging the door and the doorposts behind her.<br /> <br /> At nightfall, did they not see a dim light on the floor of a glen and they made straight for it. Although they were far away from it they were not long in reaching it.<br /> <br /> What was here but a cave full of robbers, with a large fire at its far end and a large pot on the fire and deer cooking in it.<br /> <br /> Corra-chriostag took the door and the doorposts into the cave. Looking around she noticed that there were rafters at the top of the cave.<br /> <br /> "Come on," she said to the Plocach, "we'll put the door up on the rafters."<br /> <br /> Up went the door to the rafters, and the doorposts along with it. Then did Corra-chriostag not notice a small cup in a corner of the cave! She took up a cupful of the broth that was in the pot. She and the Plocach sat, one on either side of the fire, drinking sip about from the cup. They were not long doing that when a noise was heard outside. Who was this but the robbers, who had returned! Corra-chriostag and the Plocach were startled and they jumped up on the door on the rafters. In came the robbers, each one with a full load on his back. They poured out the bags of gold and silver on the floor and started to count all that they had stolen.<br /> <br /> One of them went to the fire and started to prepare the supper. The smoke rose up around the rafters.<br /> <br /> "I'm almost suffocated," said Corra-chriostag.<br /> <br /> "Won't you be quiet?" said the Plocach to her.<br /> <br /> "My eyes, my eyes, I'll lose my eyes with that smoke," said she.<br /> <br /> "Won't you stay silent, Corra-chriostag?" said the Plocach, "in case they do away with us."<br /> <br /> "Let's go and get a drink," said she.<br /> <br /> "Don't say any more," said he, "or they will kill us without any doubt."<br /> <br /> "Whether you come or not, I'm off," replied Corra-chriostag.<br /> <br /> She moved to the lower end of the door. He did his best to keep her back. Down went the door carrying the two of them. They hit the pot that was on the fire, themselves and the door and the doorposts, all in a heap! A splash jumped out of the pot and hit the cook. He yelled blue murder.<br /> <br /> Out went the robbers and made for the moor. The one who had been scalded crept away to the hill. The Plocach and Corra-chriostag filled the basket with the gold and silver and returned home to the cottage from which they had set off. They got a new door and doorposts and they were comfortable and happy there ever after.<br /> <br /> This story is from a collection of stories available on tape, with an accompanying book, under the title 'Am Bloigh Beag le Beannachd'