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TITLE
The Young Piper of South Uist
EXTERNAL ID
HC_GAELICSTORYTAPE_022
DATE OF RECORDING
1997
PERIOD
1990s
CREATOR
unknown
SOURCE
The Highland Council
ASSET ID
2359
KEYWORDS
oral tradition
folklore
stories
Gaelic
story telling
audio

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This story is recorded in Gaelic and the following is an English translation.

The Young Piper of South Uist.

Long ago in South Uist there was an old man who had three sons. The two older ones were very good pipers, but the youngest one was not particularly good at all.

At this time the MacCrimmons in Dunvegan were pipers to the MacLeod chiefs, and they heard about these lads in Uist. They considered that they would go over to Uist to see if they could find out who were the better pipers, themselves or the old man's sons. When they arrived in Uist the lads were not at home, and their father told the MacCrimmons that they would not be returning home for a day or two. It so happened that the youngest of the boys was at this time out herding cattle on a green hill far away from their home. There he heard the sweetest and most beautiful music he had ever heard and he immediately thought that this hill was a fairy knoll. Without delay he made for the door, but before entering he placed a stick in the doorway, for he knew that if he did that he would be able to get out again, but if he did not that he would be inside forever more.

As soon as he went in he asked the little old man who was playing the pipes to teach him the tune. The old man asked him to place his tongue in his mouth. He did so and straight away he learned the tune.

When the young man arrived home the MacCrimmons were inside waiting for him and they asked him to start up his pipes to see whether he or they played better. The old man told them that there wouldn't be any point in that, that the young fellow was of no use at all. "Never mind", said they, "he'll have a go anyway, whether he's good or bad."

The lad started up his pipes and played the tune which the fairy taught him. When the MacCrimmons heard this beautiful, sweet music they said "If that is the poorest one there's no point at all in our competing with the best ones." And they just returned at once to Dunvegan.

This story is from a collection of stories available on tape, with an accompanying book, under the title 'Am Bloigh Beag le Beannachd'

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The Young Piper of South Uist

1990s

oral tradition; folklore; stories; Gaelic; story telling; audio

The Highland Council

Am Bloigh Beag le Beannachd (Cassette)

This story is recorded in Gaelic and the following is an English translation.<br /> <br /> The Young Piper of South Uist.<br /> <br /> Long ago in South Uist there was an old man who had three sons. The two older ones were very good pipers, but the youngest one was not particularly good at all.<br /> <br /> At this time the MacCrimmons in Dunvegan were pipers to the MacLeod chiefs, and they heard about these lads in Uist. They considered that they would go over to Uist to see if they could find out who were the better pipers, themselves or the old man's sons. When they arrived in Uist the lads were not at home, and their father told the MacCrimmons that they would not be returning home for a day or two. It so happened that the youngest of the boys was at this time out herding cattle on a green hill far away from their home. There he heard the sweetest and most beautiful music he had ever heard and he immediately thought that this hill was a fairy knoll. Without delay he made for the door, but before entering he placed a stick in the doorway, for he knew that if he did that he would be able to get out again, but if he did not that he would be inside forever more.<br /> <br /> As soon as he went in he asked the little old man who was playing the pipes to teach him the tune. The old man asked him to place his tongue in his mouth. He did so and straight away he learned the tune.<br /> <br /> When the young man arrived home the MacCrimmons were inside waiting for him and they asked him to start up his pipes to see whether he or they played better. The old man told them that there wouldn't be any point in that, that the young fellow was of no use at all. "Never mind", said they, "he'll have a go anyway, whether he's good or bad." <br /> <br /> The lad started up his pipes and played the tune which the fairy taught him. When the MacCrimmons heard this beautiful, sweet music they said "If that is the poorest one there's no point at all in our competing with the best ones." And they just returned at once to Dunvegan.<br /> <br /> This story is from a collection of stories available on tape, with an accompanying book, under the title 'Am Bloigh Beag le Beannachd'