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TITLE
How Black Duncan Stole the Pig
EXTERNAL ID
HC_GAELICSTORYTAPE_025
DATE OF RECORDING
1997
PERIOD
1990s
CREATOR
unknown
SOURCE
The Highland Council
ASSET ID
2363
KEYWORDS
oral tradition
folklore
stories
Gaelic
story telling
audio

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This story is recorded in Gaelic and the following is an English translation.

How Black Duncan stole the pig.

Black Duncan would not lack for anything if it was at all to be got where his hands would reach it.

On this occasion Fair-haired Colin, a poor man who had a little cottage near Black Duncan's house, had a large, fat pig. Colin thought it was time he killed and salted the pig. He had just slaughtered the pig when Black Duncan appeared ... and you may be sure he was ready to give good advice to poor Fair-haired Colin!

"Now Colin," said Duncan, "there is nobody anywhere around, throughout the length and breadth of the district, who will not know for certain that you have slaughtered your large fat pig today. You may be sure that they will come from every nook and cranny to look for small bits, to see if the meat is good and fat. But this, now, is what you will do, Colin. You take the pig away and throw it in the stream, and leave it there all night. The cold water will firm up the meat, and clean it, suitable for the salt. If anyone comes to your house in the morning asking about it you will say that it was stolen and he will not then expect to get a bit of it."

The poor simpleton did as he was told. He threw the pig into the stream near the house. Black Duncan came over during the night when poor Fair-haired Colin was sound asleep, and off he went with the pig. Next morning, when Colin noticed what had happened, he came leaping to Duncan's house to tell him that the pig was stolen.

"Quite right, Colin, quite right," said Black Duncan, "you say that and indeed there will be no fear of you."

"But I'm only telling the truth, Duncan," Colin replied, "for sure and for certain and without a doubt the pig has been stolen. There's not a trace of it."

"No, no there isn't, Colin," said the other one, "You're quite right; just you say that and everything will be fine."

"Listen to me, Duncan," said Colin, growing cross and angry, "listen to me while I tell you that the pig has been stolen as sure as you're alive."

"That's it exactly, Colin," said Black Duncan, "that's just what I told you to say. You keep on saying that and I'll guarantee that the people of the village will not bother you at all."

There was no point in poor Colin saying another word about the matter. There was nothing else for it but to go home in a sad and sorry state, and Black Duncan kept and ate the big fat pig and as far as I have heard it did not do him any harm at all!

This story is from a collection of stories available on tape, with an accompanying book, under the title 'Am Bloigh Beag le Beannachd'

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How Black Duncan Stole the Pig

1990s

oral tradition; folklore; stories; Gaelic; story telling; audio

The Highland Council

Am Bloigh Beag le Beannachd (Cassette)

This story is recorded in Gaelic and the following is an English translation.<br /> <br /> How Black Duncan stole the pig.<br /> <br /> Black Duncan would not lack for anything if it was at all to be got where his hands would reach it.<br /> <br /> On this occasion Fair-haired Colin, a poor man who had a little cottage near Black Duncan's house, had a large, fat pig. Colin thought it was time he killed and salted the pig. He had just slaughtered the pig when Black Duncan appeared ... and you may be sure he was ready to give good advice to poor Fair-haired Colin!<br /> <br /> "Now Colin," said Duncan, "there is nobody anywhere around, throughout the length and breadth of the district, who will not know for certain that you have slaughtered your large fat pig today. You may be sure that they will come from every nook and cranny to look for small bits, to see if the meat is good and fat. But this, now, is what you will do, Colin. You take the pig away and throw it in the stream, and leave it there all night. The cold water will firm up the meat, and clean it, suitable for the salt. If anyone comes to your house in the morning asking about it you will say that it was stolen and he will not then expect to get a bit of it."<br /> <br /> The poor simpleton did as he was told. He threw the pig into the stream near the house. Black Duncan came over during the night when poor Fair-haired Colin was sound asleep, and off he went with the pig. Next morning, when Colin noticed what had happened, he came leaping to Duncan's house to tell him that the pig was stolen.<br /> <br /> "Quite right, Colin, quite right," said Black Duncan, "you say that and indeed there will be no fear of you."<br /> <br /> "But I'm only telling the truth, Duncan," Colin replied, "for sure and for certain and without a doubt the pig has been stolen. There's not a trace of it."<br /> <br /> "No, no there isn't, Colin," said the other one, "You're quite right; just you say that and everything will be fine."<br /> <br /> "Listen to me, Duncan," said Colin, growing cross and angry, "listen to me while I tell you that the pig has been stolen as sure as you're alive."<br /> <br /> "That's it exactly, Colin," said Black Duncan, "that's just what I told you to say. You keep on saying that and I'll guarantee that the people of the village will not bother you at all."<br /> <br /> There was no point in poor Colin saying another word about the matter. There was nothing else for it but to go home in a sad and sorry state, and Black Duncan kept and ate the big fat pig and as far as I have heard it did not do him any harm at all!<br /> <br /> This story is from a collection of stories available on tape, with an accompanying book, under the title 'Am Bloigh Beag le Beannachd'