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TITLE
From Sea to Sea (7 of 19)
EXTERNAL ID
HC_STS_FROMSEATOSEA_07
DATE OF RECORDING
2001
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Bob Pegg & Hugh McNally
SOURCE
The Highland Council
ASSET ID
2405
KEYWORDS
canals
waterways
paddle steamers
Caledonian MacBrayne
audio

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The following extract is taken from 'From Sea to Sea', an audio celebration of the history, people, landscape and culture of the Great Glen waterway - The Caledonian Canal. The project was created in 2001 by Bob Pegg and funded by Highland Council through the British Waterways 'Living Waterways Programme'.

Narrator: The canal steamer was, for long the most direct route linking the south side of Loch Ness with Inverness and beyond. One anecdote, still retold in the area, concerned a young man called 'Angie'. Dispatched by his father to take the calf - an important item of income - to the annual market, entrusted for the first time with the task, Angie celebrated rather too freely in the hostelries of Inverness, and on board the return steamer. And, back at Inverfarigaig Pier, not a penny was left from the sale. Hugh McNally takes up the story.

'The boat, of course, was even better equipped than the town because the residents' bar was there and there was nothing else to do but pass the time. Ye can, ye can imagine because Angie was jingling money in his pocket an he was quite the big man. His friends and neighbours would be congratulatin him on the good price he got for the calf, an how was the family, an how was the father, an generally flatterin him an, and one thing led to another. One, one would stand a round an the next fellow would stand his round and this went on. So by the time the boat reached Inverfarigaig again Angus was in great form but his pockets was just aboot empty and he duly had to set for home. Ye can imagine by after five miles' walkin he, he would be pretty sober. And we don't know what thoughts were in his mind, but the moment o truth was when the old man asked how he got on and put his hand out for the cash - the cash wasn't there. There was only a few pennies in his pocket. So, it was pretty devastating. Nobody knows what was said but Angie, on the whole, was fairly satisfied he'd - it was worth it; nobody beat him over the head with stick or anything. And he thought, well, time heals all wounds and the old folks were, of course they were, they were upset.

But time went on, time went on, an by the time a full year had passed, another calf had been produced an, and obviously the calf was going to be disposed of. Angie by this time had thought that all was forgotten an he was looking forward to another repeat, or at least of another good outing. But the days were passing an the weeks were passing; the calf was getting bigger an, and Angie, of course, wasn't going to say a word, an the father was determined he wasn't going to say a word, an this went on an, at last, Angie had to give in, an one morning he said to his father, 'When - when are we putting the calf away, father?' 'We're not!' 'An what will ye do with it, father?' 'We'll eat it. Ye drank the last one!'

[Button Box, 'Loch Ness Reel', by Hugh McNally]

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From Sea to Sea (7 of 19)

2000s

canals; waterways; paddle steamers; Caledonian MacBrayne; audio

The Highland Council

The Highland Council: From Sea to Sea

The following extract is taken from 'From Sea to Sea', an audio celebration of the history, people, landscape and culture of the Great Glen waterway - The Caledonian Canal. The project was created in 2001 by Bob Pegg and funded by Highland Council through the British Waterways 'Living Waterways Programme'. <br /> <br /> Narrator: The canal steamer was, for long the most direct route linking the south side of Loch Ness with Inverness and beyond. One anecdote, still retold in the area, concerned a young man called 'Angie'. Dispatched by his father to take the calf - an important item of income - to the annual market, entrusted for the first time with the task, Angie celebrated rather too freely in the hostelries of Inverness, and on board the return steamer. And, back at Inverfarigaig Pier, not a penny was left from the sale. Hugh McNally takes up the story.<br /> <br /> 'The boat, of course, was even better equipped than the town because the residents' bar was there and there was nothing else to do but pass the time. Ye can, ye can imagine because Angie was jingling money in his pocket an he was quite the big man. His friends and neighbours would be congratulatin him on the good price he got for the calf, an how was the family, an how was the father, an generally flatterin him an, and one thing led to another. One, one would stand a round an the next fellow would stand his round and this went on. So by the time the boat reached Inverfarigaig again Angus was in great form but his pockets was just aboot empty and he duly had to set for home. Ye can imagine by after five miles' walkin he, he would be pretty sober. And we don't know what thoughts were in his mind, but the moment o truth was when the old man asked how he got on and put his hand out for the cash - the cash wasn't there. There was only a few pennies in his pocket. So, it was pretty devastating. Nobody knows what was said but Angie, on the whole, was fairly satisfied he'd - it was worth it; nobody beat him over the head with stick or anything. And he thought, well, time heals all wounds and the old folks were, of course they were, they were upset. <br /> <br /> But time went on, time went on, an by the time a full year had passed, another calf had been produced an, and obviously the calf was going to be disposed of. Angie by this time had thought that all was forgotten an he was looking forward to another repeat, or at least of another good outing. But the days were passing an the weeks were passing; the calf was getting bigger an, and Angie, of course, wasn't going to say a word, an the father was determined he wasn't going to say a word, an this went on an, at last, Angie had to give in, an one morning he said to his father, 'When - when are we putting the calf away, father?' 'We're not!' 'An what will ye do with it, father?' 'We'll eat it. Ye drank the last one!'<br /> <br /> [Button Box, 'Loch Ness Reel', by Hugh McNally]