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TITLE
From Sea to Sea (8 of 19)
EXTERNAL ID
HC_STS_FROMSEATOSEA_08
DATE OF RECORDING
2001
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Bob Pegg & Pat MacDonald
SOURCE
The Highland Council
ASSET ID
2406
KEYWORDS
canals
waterways
paddle steamers
audio

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The following extract is taken from 'From Sea to Sea', an audio celebration of the history, people, landscape and culture of the Great Glen waterway - The Caledonian Canal. The project was created in 2001 by Bob Pegg and funded by Highland Council through the British Waterways 'Living Waterways Programme'.

[Button Box, 'Loch Ness Reel, by Hugh McNally]

Pat MacDonald reflects on the busy comings and goings at Invermoriston Pier.

'Coal boats, timber boats, mainly - odd cement boat. Ah've seen two, or even three boats, tied up at the pier so they weren't very big. For instance, ye may see one o the old coal boats - two o them in fact - at Loch Dochfour. There are two hulks there. They've been there since ever that I can remember. But these were sailing boats - used to come in to the pier with coal an take timber away. A horse an trap, which was used to carry the mails, an mails an passengers laid up, in the first place had met the steamer, took the mail from the steamer to the post office. Now the mail was delivered that evening right up to the glen. This was the store, and mail - various goods were stored there, if not - There were either met at the pier, or stored there, like of bolls o meal and feeding stuffs, an whatever, and groceries; everything came by boat of course. There was, before 1930, buses started in 1930, but before that there was, the only way to was, to go to Inverness was either by boat or walk it, or yer horse.

This end was a store. There were three barrels o beer on the gantry down, low level, an you - the tap was directly into the barrel - an you filled a glass o beer or mug o beer through a - either a wooden tap or a brass tap. If you wanted to sit down you could sit on a barrel over here, or there, or this box of, or that box. But they only sold beer. Actually the sign on the end o the building said, 'Licensed to Sell Beer and Porter'. I don't know what porter was - sort of stout was it? - but not whisky. But Ah think they had a wee drop of whisky under the counter'

[Button Box, 'Loch Ness Reel, by Hugh McNally]

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From Sea to Sea (8 of 19)

2000s

canals; waterways; paddle steamers; audio

The Highland Council

The Highland Council: From Sea to Sea

The following extract is taken from 'From Sea to Sea', an audio celebration of the history, people, landscape and culture of the Great Glen waterway - The Caledonian Canal. The project was created in 2001 by Bob Pegg and funded by Highland Council through the British Waterways 'Living Waterways Programme'. <br /> <br /> [Button Box, 'Loch Ness Reel, by Hugh McNally]<br /> <br /> Pat MacDonald reflects on the busy comings and goings at Invermoriston Pier.<br /> <br /> 'Coal boats, timber boats, mainly - odd cement boat. Ah've seen two, or even three boats, tied up at the pier so they weren't very big. For instance, ye may see one o the old coal boats - two o them in fact - at Loch Dochfour. There are two hulks there. They've been there since ever that I can remember. But these were sailing boats - used to come in to the pier with coal an take timber away. A horse an trap, which was used to carry the mails, an mails an passengers laid up, in the first place had met the steamer, took the mail from the steamer to the post office. Now the mail was delivered that evening right up to the glen. This was the store, and mail - various goods were stored there, if not - There were either met at the pier, or stored there, like of bolls o meal and feeding stuffs, an whatever, and groceries; everything came by boat of course. There was, before 1930, buses started in 1930, but before that there was, the only way to was, to go to Inverness was either by boat or walk it, or yer horse. <br /> <br /> This end was a store. There were three barrels o beer on the gantry down, low level, an you - the tap was directly into the barrel - an you filled a glass o beer or mug o beer through a - either a wooden tap or a brass tap. If you wanted to sit down you could sit on a barrel over here, or there, or this box of, or that box. But they only sold beer. Actually the sign on the end o the building said, 'Licensed to Sell Beer and Porter'. I don't know what porter was - sort of stout was it? - but not whisky. But Ah think they had a wee drop of whisky under the counter'<br /> <br /> [Button Box, 'Loch Ness Reel, by Hugh McNally]