Please Sign In | Register
Google pluspinterestShare on Stumble UponShare on RedditFacebookShare on Tumblr
TITLE
Pastoral pipes
EXTERNAL ID
AB_ACHILTIBUIE_020
PLACENAME
N/A
DATE OF IMAGE
2006
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Achiltibuie Piping School
SOURCE
Achiltibuie Piping School
ASSET ID
262
KEYWORDS
bagpipe
bagpipes
chanters
drone
regulator
Pastoral pipes

Seen here is the end of one of the drones of a set of pastoral pipes. Pastoral pipes were blown by bellows and developed in the early 18th century for use in indoor pastoral dramas which were fashionable at the time. 'The Compleat Tutor for the Pastoral or New Bagpipe' was published by John Geoghegan about 1746. Manufactured in London, Newcastle and Dublin, as well as in Scotland, pastoral pipes are thought to be a forerunner of the Union and Uillean pipes.

One of the features of the pastoral pipes is a narrow conical chanter with an extension, known as the 'foot joint', allowing the instrument to extend to a second octave. The early instruments had only two drones - bass and tenor - but later versions had three or even four drones, including a baritone, set in a common stock. Regulators with four or five keys were sometimes added to the instrument in the later 18th century.

For guidance on the use of images and other content, please see the Terms and Conditions page.
High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
Powered by Capture

Pastoral pipes

2000s

bagpipe; bagpipes; chanters; drone; regulator

Achiltibuie Piping School

Bagpipes from Achiltibuie Piping School

Seen here is the end of one of the drones of a set of pastoral pipes. Pastoral pipes were blown by bellows and developed in the early 18th century for use in indoor pastoral dramas which were fashionable at the time. 'The Compleat Tutor for the Pastoral or New Bagpipe' was published by John Geoghegan about 1746. Manufactured in London, Newcastle and Dublin, as well as in Scotland, pastoral pipes are thought to be a forerunner of the Union and Uillean pipes. <br /> <br /> One of the features of the pastoral pipes is a narrow conical chanter with an extension, known as the 'foot joint', allowing the instrument to extend to a second octave. The early instruments had only two drones - bass and tenor - but later versions had three or even four drones, including a baritone, set in a common stock. Regulators with four or five keys were sometimes added to the instrument in the later 18th century.