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TITLE
Memories of a Highland Drover (4)
EXTERNAL ID
PC_HIGHLANDLIVESTOCK_AUDIO_04
PLACENAME
Ardross
DISTRICT
Invergordon
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Rosskeen
DATE OF RECORDING
2006
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Ian Munro
SOURCE
Highland Livestock Heritage Society
ASSET ID
2662
KEYWORDS
drovers
droving
markets
cattle drovers
cattle droving
marts
cattle sales
audios

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In this audio extract, recorded in 2006, former drover Ian Munro talks about the drovers' stance at Ardross, near Invergordon. The image shows an example of a drovers' stance at Corrieyairack.

Now getting back to the droving. Are you aware that there is a drovers' stance up at Ardross? And that land was government property, and if you were dr-, taking stock across the Struie, you were quite entitled to go in there with your sheep or cattle and give them a rest and stay the night with them, or see that they were looked after and then take them out next day. That's what was, that was the drover's stance up at, up at Ardross. And the like of Donnie Croncan and my father and youngsters and that, and probably maybe Tod MacDonald too, walking cattle, that was a place that you made for. You know, you would maybe leave Ardgay, now I'll make for the drovers' stance at Ardross. That was only a day's, well, most of the day was spent getting up there, and the next day you took them and then you made Dingwall.

Interviewer: In two days, from Ardgay?

You could walk cattle, you could walk cattle fifteen miles in a day, fifteen or maybe, maybe more than that. You could walk cattle further than you could walk sheep.

Ian Munro was born at Blackhill Farm, Evanton, Ross-shire in 1933. His father and grandfather were sheep and cattle dealers, and it was through his father's links with the livestock auctioneers, Reith and Anderson, that Ian, aged only 11 or 12, began assisting at livestock sales in Dingwall. At the age of 18, Ian started going out to the Uists with Reith and Anderson as a drover to help at the seasonal sales. At that time, there were no facilities for landing lorries on the islands so cattle had to be driven on foot from the sales to the boat, until the advent of roll on roll off ferries in 1965.

Ian took over the family farm near Evanton in 1964 and farmed there until 1984. He continued to help out at auction sales in Dingwall when required. Since giving up the farm, Ian has remained in farming related work, driving lorries, selling grass seed and helping neighbours and family with livestock.

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Memories of a Highland Drover (4)

ROSS: Rosskeen

2000s

drovers; droving; markets; cattle drovers; cattle droving; marts; cattle sales; audios

Highland Livestock Heritage Society

Highland Livestock Heritage Society audios

In this audio extract, recorded in 2006, former drover Ian Munro talks about the drovers' stance at Ardross, near Invergordon. The image shows an example of a drovers' stance at Corrieyairack.<br /> <br /> Now getting back to the droving. Are you aware that there is a drovers' stance up at Ardross? And that land was government property, and if you were dr-, taking stock across the Struie, you were quite entitled to go in there with your sheep or cattle and give them a rest and stay the night with them, or see that they were looked after and then take them out next day. That's what was, that was the drover's stance up at, up at Ardross. And the like of Donnie Croncan and my father and youngsters and that, and probably maybe Tod MacDonald too, walking cattle, that was a place that you made for. You know, you would maybe leave Ardgay, now I'll make for the drovers' stance at Ardross. That was only a day's, well, most of the day was spent getting up there, and the next day you took them and then you made Dingwall.<br /> <br /> Interviewer: In two days, from Ardgay?<br /> <br /> You could walk cattle, you could walk cattle fifteen miles in a day, fifteen or maybe, maybe more than that. You could walk cattle further than you could walk sheep.<br /> <br /> Ian Munro was born at Blackhill Farm, Evanton, Ross-shire in 1933. His father and grandfather were sheep and cattle dealers, and it was through his father's links with the livestock auctioneers, Reith and Anderson, that Ian, aged only 11 or 12, began assisting at livestock sales in Dingwall. At the age of 18, Ian started going out to the Uists with Reith and Anderson as a drover to help at the seasonal sales. At that time, there were no facilities for landing lorries on the islands so cattle had to be driven on foot from the sales to the boat, until the advent of roll on roll off ferries in 1965. <br /> <br /> Ian took over the family farm near Evanton in 1964 and farmed there until 1984. He continued to help out at auction sales in Dingwall when required. Since giving up the farm, Ian has remained in farming related work, driving lorries, selling grass seed and helping neighbours and family with livestock.