Please Sign In | Register
Google pluspinterestShare on Stumble UponShare on RedditFacebookShare on Tumblr
TITLE
Snow blower near Georgemas
EXTERNAL ID
PC_HRS_STATIONS_001_646
PLACENAME
Georgemas
DISTRICT
Caithness - Western
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
CAITHNESS: Halkirk
CREATOR
Colour Print
SOURCE
Highland Railway Society
ASSET ID
27360
KEYWORDS
Highland Railway
HR
railways
Snow blower near Georgemas

Snow blower outwith Georgemas. Vallance in his book Highland Railway describes them as follows:

"North of Inverness, on the borders of Sutherland and Caithness, a special type of fencing, known as a 'blower', the invention of a Lancashire man named Howie, was tried with some success. Close­ boarded fences, very similar to long wooden tables, were erected on both sides of the track, much closer to the rails than the ordinary snow fences. The inner edges of the blowers almost touched the ground, but the outer edges were raised some eight o ten feet. These artificial troughs deflected the wind currents away from the railway, causing the snow to be swept up and deposited on the far side, out of harm's way."

For guidance on the use of images and other content, please see the Terms and Conditions page.
High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
Powered by Capture

Snow blower near Georgemas

CAITHNESS: Halkirk

Highland Railway; HR; railways;

Highland Railway Society

Highland Railway Society - Stations

Snow blower outwith Georgemas. Vallance in his book Highland Railway describes them as follows: <br /> <br /> "North of Inverness, on the borders of Sutherland and Caithness, a special type of fencing, known as a 'blower', the invention of a Lancashire man named Howie, was tried with some success. Close­ boarded fences, very similar to long wooden tables, were erected on both sides of the track, much closer to the rails than the ordinary snow fences. The inner edges of the blowers almost touched the ground, but the outer edges were raised some eight o ten feet. These artificial troughs deflected the wind currents away from the railway, causing the snow to be swept up and deposited on the far side, out of harm's way."