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TITLE
Overnight train in the north platform at Inverness
EXTERNAL ID
PC_HRS_STATIONS_001_767
PLACENAME
Inverness
CREATOR
LPC
SOURCE
Highland Railway Society
ASSET ID
27476
KEYWORDS
Highland Railway
HR

HRS
Overnight train in the north platform at Inverness

A busy scene on the north platform at Inverness Station during the early years of the 20th Century. On the left is the overnight train from the south and while some passengers are continuing their journey in the Kyle of Lochalsh train on the right. The Aberdeen train can be seen in the distance.

The somewhat unusual arrangement of lines proved convenient as, apart from a few through coaches, Inverness was the terminus of all trains . To facilitate the interchange of passengers, it became the practice to send trains from the south via the Rose Street curve, where they were reversed into the northern part of the station. A similar procedure was adopted with arrivals from the north, but trains from the Keith line usually ran direct to a platform in the southern section. Such levels of customer service were important in those days.

The Inverness & Nairn Railway first opened a station in Inverness on 7 November 1855 and it developed to become the railway centre of the Highlands with routes radiating south to Perth and beyond; east to Aberdeen, west to Kyle of Lochalsh and north to Wick. It is still open.

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Overnight train in the north platform at Inverness

Highland Railway; HR; ; HRS

Highland Railway Society

Highland Railway Society - Stations

A busy scene on the north platform at Inverness Station during the early years of the 20th Century. On the left is the overnight train from the south and while some passengers are continuing their journey in the Kyle of Lochalsh train on the right. The Aberdeen train can be seen in the distance.<br /> <br /> The somewhat unusual arrangement of lines proved convenient as, apart from a few through coaches, Inverness was the terminus of all trains . To facilitate the interchange of passengers, it became the practice to send trains from the south via the Rose Street curve, where they were reversed into the northern part of the station. A similar procedure was adopted with arrivals from the north, but trains from the Keith line usually ran direct to a platform in the southern section. Such levels of customer service were important in those days.<br /> <br /> The Inverness & Nairn Railway first opened a station in Inverness on 7 November 1855 and it developed to become the railway centre of the Highlands with routes radiating south to Perth and beyond; east to Aberdeen, west to Kyle of Lochalsh and north to Wick. It is still open.