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TITLE
Welsh's Bridge (1)
EXTERNAL ID
PC_HRS_STATIONS_001_786
PLACENAME
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona
CREATOR
Whyte
SOURCE
Highland Railway Society
ASSET ID
27494
KEYWORDS
Highland Railway
HR

HRS
Welsh's Bridge (1)

This photograph appeared in the Highland Railway Journal No 39 with the following description by David Stirling:

"Everyone interested in the HR has heard of Welsh's Bridge, but generally in connection with the signal box named after it. How many have seen a photograph of the bridge itself? This was built to accommodate Mr Welsh of Millburn House, whose lands were to be divided by the coming of the new railway in 1855. It provided a route from Millburn House to the main road south of the railway, and to the "hut of health". This stretch of the railway was doubled in 1862, as the first stage of a never completed doubling between Inverness and Forres. At the same time the layout and signalling at Inverness were modernised and an interlocked signal cabin was provided at the divergence of the harbour branch and the line to the north from the main line. This was referred to as Johnstone's Box, after one of its signalmen. In the 1880s, more modern signalling was provided and a brick signal box was provided, named after the nearest structure, Welsh's Bridge. This is the signal cabin visible through the bridge on the right hand side of the line, although at the time of the photograph, 1897, this cabin was a good deal shorter than it was latterly. At the time of the photograph, the connecting line to Rose Street was single track, connecting with the Up line at Welsh's Bridge, hence the need for the facing crossover in the foreground. The line straight on is that to Rose Street, while Lochgorm works can just be made out to the left of it. On the left are the beginnings of the goods and locomotive yards at Inverness. One singular HR feature is the boxing in of the point rodding, conspicuous on the right of the photograph.

Welsh's Bridge itself was dismantled in 1898, when the direct line to Aviemore was built. The new line came in behind the photographer and ran as two parallel tracks, the Aviemore lines, to the right of the photograph, requiring the removal of the road over Welsh's Bridge, which ran parallel and close to the existing railway. The building of these lines changed the appearance of the area almost beyond recognition. A few years later, the short shunt head which is visible on the left through the bridge was extended eastwards (to the left) as an additional goods line between Millburn Junction and Welsh's Bridge. This construction obliterated the abutment of the former bridge and the ticket platform on the left.

On the left is the ticket platform for trains arriving from the south, carefully placed so that even trains proceeding to the north platforms at Inverness by running past Rose Street and reversing could use it. The Board approved the construction of this platform in March 1863. It probably fell in to disuse when the Aviemore line was opened, for there was no corresponding ticket platform on that line, and it appears that the north line ticket platform was not renewed (despite a Board decision to do so) when the line was doubled through to Ness Viaduct. Thereafter, ticket collection on the local trains was carried out at the last stopping station before Inverness.

The photo, an HR 'official', was taken by D. Whyte and is one of three recently donated to the Society's by the Glasgow & South Western Railway Association, to whom we are gratefully thankful."

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Welsh's Bridge (1)

INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona

Highland Railway; HR; ; HRS

Highland Railway Society

Highland Railway Society - Stations

This photograph appeared in the Highland Railway Journal No 39 with the following description by David Stirling:<br /> <br /> "Everyone interested in the HR has heard of Welsh's Bridge, but generally in connection with the signal box named after it. How many have seen a photograph of the bridge itself? This was built to accommodate Mr Welsh of Millburn House, whose lands were to be divided by the coming of the new railway in 1855. It provided a route from Millburn House to the main road south of the railway, and to the "hut of health". This stretch of the railway was doubled in 1862, as the first stage of a never completed doubling between Inverness and Forres. At the same time the layout and signalling at Inverness were modernised and an interlocked signal cabin was provided at the divergence of the harbour branch and the line to the north from the main line. This was referred to as Johnstone's Box, after one of its signalmen. In the 1880s, more modern signalling was provided and a brick signal box was provided, named after the nearest structure, Welsh's Bridge. This is the signal cabin visible through the bridge on the right hand side of the line, although at the time of the photograph, 1897, this cabin was a good deal shorter than it was latterly. At the time of the photograph, the connecting line to Rose Street was single track, connecting with the Up line at Welsh's Bridge, hence the need for the facing crossover in the foreground. The line straight on is that to Rose Street, while Lochgorm works can just be made out to the left of it. On the left are the beginnings of the goods and locomotive yards at Inverness. One singular HR feature is the boxing in of the point rodding, conspicuous on the right of the photograph.<br /> <br /> Welsh's Bridge itself was dismantled in 1898, when the direct line to Aviemore was built. The new line came in behind the photographer and ran as two parallel tracks, the Aviemore lines, to the right of the photograph, requiring the removal of the road over Welsh's Bridge, which ran parallel and close to the existing railway. The building of these lines changed the appearance of the area almost beyond recognition. A few years later, the short shunt head which is visible on the left through the bridge was extended eastwards (to the left) as an additional goods line between Millburn Junction and Welsh's Bridge. This construction obliterated the abutment of the former bridge and the ticket platform on the left.<br /> <br /> On the left is the ticket platform for trains arriving from the south, carefully placed so that even trains proceeding to the north platforms at Inverness by running past Rose Street and reversing could use it. The Board approved the construction of this platform in March 1863. It probably fell in to disuse when the Aviemore line was opened, for there was no corresponding ticket platform on that line, and it appears that the north line ticket platform was not renewed (despite a Board decision to do so) when the line was doubled through to Ness Viaduct. Thereafter, ticket collection on the local trains was carried out at the last stopping station before Inverness.<br /> <br /> The photo, an HR 'official', was taken by D. Whyte and is one of three recently donated to the Society's by the Glasgow & South Western Railway Association, to whom we are gratefully thankful."