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TITLE
Two Big Goods departing Inverness
EXTERNAL ID
PC_HRS_STATIONS_001_797
PLACENAME
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona
CREATOR
Ex L Ward coli
SOURCE
Highland Railway Society
ASSET ID
27505
KEYWORDS
Highland Railway
HR
steam engine
Two Big Goods departing Inverness

Two 'Big Goods' locomotives, one in Jones Livery passing No.100 'Glenbruar' (in Drummond livery).

The 'Big Goods' were designed by David Jones, the HR's Locomotive Superintendent and built in the 1890s. They were the first British locomotive with the 4-6-0 wheel arrangement and at the time of their introduction they were the heaviest and most powerful locomotives in the country. Thankfully one, No.103 has been preserved and at the time of writing (2009) is on display at the Glasgow Museum of Transport.

'Glenbruar' was a 'Strath Class' locomotive. She was built in June 1892 as HR No.100 and became LMS No.14276 before being withdrawn in February 1930.

Inverness & Nairn Railway first opened a station in Inverness on 7 November 1855 and it developed to become the railway centre of the Highlands with routes radiating south to Perth and beyond; east to Aberdeen, west to Kyle of Lochalsh and north to Wick. It is still open.

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High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
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Two Big Goods departing Inverness

INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona

Highland Railway; HR; steam engine;

Highland Railway Society

Highland Railway Society - Stations

Two 'Big Goods' locomotives, one in Jones Livery passing No.100 'Glenbruar' (in Drummond livery).<br /> <br /> The 'Big Goods' were designed by David Jones, the HR's Locomotive Superintendent and built in the 1890s. They were the first British locomotive with the 4-6-0 wheel arrangement and at the time of their introduction they were the heaviest and most powerful locomotives in the country. Thankfully one, No.103 has been preserved and at the time of writing (2009) is on display at the Glasgow Museum of Transport.<br /> <br /> 'Glenbruar' was a 'Strath Class' locomotive. She was built in June 1892 as HR No.100 and became LMS No.14276 before being withdrawn in February 1930.<br /> <br /> Inverness & Nairn Railway first opened a station in Inverness on 7 November 1855 and it developed to become the railway centre of the Highlands with routes radiating south to Perth and beyond; east to Aberdeen, west to Kyle of Lochalsh and north to Wick. It is still open.