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TITLE
Chores on a Caithness croft
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_CAITHNESS_CROFTING_13
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
CAITHNESS
PERIOD
1980s
CREATOR
unknown
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
2768
KEYWORDS
crofting
crofters
crofter
croft
crofts
school
soup
chores
peats
bible
Scripture
Scriptures
cleaning
audio

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In this audio extract a Caithness resident remembers some of the chores she had to carry out on the family croft after leaving Wick High School, around 1940.

'Well, long ago when we were young, it used to be on the Saturday, we used to have to make the soup - the soup wis made. An we had to take in peats, we had a whole - a place under wur window. We used to clean it out on a Saturday an then I'd build it up wi peats all on the inside. An we used to have to take all the shoes, everybody's shoes wis taken along, an they were all brushed ready for Sunday. An we did nothin on Sunday, but we all walked to the church. An how, how many mile wis that we had to walk to the church? Aboot two an a half, three mile. Yeah. Every Sunday. We all had to go every Sunday. An when we came home we had the dinner, an then the books wis taken, they called it. Ye took the Bible out an ye did that. Well, the head o the hoose used to always make with the, kind a service, ye know, and then at night again before we went to our beds, the same thing happened. That's how we spent our Sunday.'

Caithness crofts were very similar to those in the other crofting counties of Scotland: Argyll, Inverness, Ross and Cromarty, Sutherland, Orkney and Shetland. The crofter kept a few animals - usually one or more cows, some sheep, poultry and a pig. The horse was important as a beast of burden until it was largely replaced by small tractors from the end of the 1940s onwards. The usual crops were oats (always called corn in Caithness), potatoes, turnips and hay, with varying amounts of vegetables. Up until the 1950s crofters with access to larger amounts of land showed a considerable degree of self-sufficiency, but it was quite usual for members of the family to have jobs off the croft. Many crofters had a skilled trade that enabled them to find work away from home. The crofthouse's water supply was usually a nearby well, spring or burn; the most ready supply of fuel for cooking and heating was peat, which had to be cut and processed on the moor in summer

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Chores on a Caithness croft

CAITHNESS

1980s

crofting; crofters; crofter; croft; crofts; school; soup; chores; peats; bible; Scripture; Scriptures; cleaning; audio

Highland Libraries

Caithness Recordings: Crofting & Farming

In this audio extract a Caithness resident remembers some of the chores she had to carry out on the family croft after leaving Wick High School, around 1940.<br /> <br /> 'Well, long ago when we were young, it used to be on the Saturday, we used to have to make the soup - the soup wis made. An we had to take in peats, we had a whole - a place under wur window. We used to clean it out on a Saturday an then I'd build it up wi peats all on the inside. An we used to have to take all the shoes, everybody's shoes wis taken along, an they were all brushed ready for Sunday. An we did nothin on Sunday, but we all walked to the church. An how, how many mile wis that we had to walk to the church? Aboot two an a half, three mile. Yeah. Every Sunday. We all had to go every Sunday. An when we came home we had the dinner, an then the books wis taken, they called it. Ye took the Bible out an ye did that. Well, the head o the hoose used to always make with the, kind a service, ye know, and then at night again before we went to our beds, the same thing happened. That's how we spent our Sunday.'<br /> <br /> Caithness crofts were very similar to those in the other crofting counties of Scotland: Argyll, Inverness, Ross and Cromarty, Sutherland, Orkney and Shetland. The crofter kept a few animals - usually one or more cows, some sheep, poultry and a pig. The horse was important as a beast of burden until it was largely replaced by small tractors from the end of the 1940s onwards. The usual crops were oats (always called corn in Caithness), potatoes, turnips and hay, with varying amounts of vegetables. Up until the 1950s crofters with access to larger amounts of land showed a considerable degree of self-sufficiency, but it was quite usual for members of the family to have jobs off the croft. Many crofters had a skilled trade that enabled them to find work away from home. The crofthouse's water supply was usually a nearby well, spring or burn; the most ready supply of fuel for cooking and heating was peat, which had to be cut and processed on the moor in summer