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TITLE
Conditions at a Caithness rural school
EXTERNAL ID
QZP40_CAITHNESS_CROFTING_21
PLACENAME
Canisbay
DISTRICT
Northern Caithness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
CAITHNESS: Canisbay
PERIOD
1980s
CREATOR
unknown
SOURCE
Highland Libraries
ASSET ID
2781
KEYWORDS
crofting
crofters
crofter
croft
crofts
school days
Hydro-Electric
coal fires
wells
water
audio

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In this audio extract a Canisbay crofter reflects on his schooldays in rural Caithness, before the advent of piped water and central heating. Electricity reached most of rural Caithness in the later 1940s and early 1950s through the work of the North of Scotland Hydro-Electric Board. Ninety per cent of crofting households were connected to the national grid by the early 1970s.

'The school Ah went'll - it wis a coal fire. The teacher took in the coal an put the fire on. He had to keep the fire goin in the winter an if it wis very cauld, kinda day, he took ye all in aroon the fire an ye sat roon the coal fire if it wis too cauld. There wis no such a thing then as central heatin - at wis out. An in the first school Ah went'll ye'd to go to what they called the well - for watter. It wis a spring. An so many scholars each day were detailed to go to carry is watter from the well. They hadnae too far to go. But at the second school - at's the Canisbay school Ah went'll now - the (what d'ye call it?) the watter wis in a tap - piped - it wis no so bad'

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Conditions at a Caithness rural school

CAITHNESS: Canisbay

1980s

crofting; crofters; crofter; croft; crofts; school days; Hydro-Electric; coal fires; wells; water; audio

Highland Libraries

Caithness Recordings: Schools

In this audio extract a Canisbay crofter reflects on his schooldays in rural Caithness, before the advent of piped water and central heating. Electricity reached most of rural Caithness in the later 1940s and early 1950s through the work of the North of Scotland Hydro-Electric Board. Ninety per cent of crofting households were connected to the national grid by the early 1970s. <br /> <br /> 'The school Ah went'll - it wis a coal fire. The teacher took in the coal an put the fire on. He had to keep the fire goin in the winter an if it wis very cauld, kinda day, he took ye all in aroon the fire an ye sat roon the coal fire if it wis too cauld. There wis no such a thing then as central heatin - at wis out. An in the first school Ah went'll ye'd to go to what they called the well - for watter. It wis a spring. An so many scholars each day were detailed to go to carry is watter from the well. They hadnae too far to go. But at the second school - at's the Canisbay school Ah went'll now - the (what d'ye call it?) the watter wis in a tap - piped - it wis no so bad'