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TITLE
'Hebridean Express' at Strome Ferry, c1970
EXTERNAL ID
PC_HRS_STATIONS_001_1282
PLACENAME
Strome Ferry
DISTRICT
South West Ross
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Lochalsh
DATE OF IMAGE
c.1971
PERIOD
1970s
SOURCE
Highland Railway Society
ASSET ID
27915
KEYWORDS
railway stations
trains
Stromeferry
'Hebridean Express' at Strome Ferry, c1970

This photograph shows 'Hebridean Express' at Strome Ferry, c1970.

The Hebridean Express was the name given to a three-day railtour which began in Crewe and collected passengers from other cities in the northwest of England before travelling to Inverness and Kyle of Lochalsh.

Strome Ferry was the original terminus of the Dingwall and Skye Railway which opened in 1870. The line was worked by the Highland Railway which officially absorbed it in August 1880. Ferry services were run from here to a variety of mainland and island destinations. To begin with the ferries were run by the Dingwall and Skye Railway, then the Highland Railway and finally David MacBrayne.

The line was extended to Kyle of Lochalsh in November 1897. In the early 1960s the spelling was changed to Stromeferry. It is still served by regular passenger services although it was closed to goods traffic in June 1964. A siding was built for the fabrication yard for oil platforms at Loch Kishorn which opened in 1975. The siding closed in the mid-1980s.

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'Hebridean Express' at Strome Ferry, c1970

ROSS: Lochalsh

1970s

railway stations; trains; Stromeferry

Highland Railway Society

Highland Railway Society - Stations

This photograph shows 'Hebridean Express' at Strome Ferry, c1970.<br /> <br /> The Hebridean Express was the name given to a three-day railtour which began in Crewe and collected passengers from other cities in the northwest of England before travelling to Inverness and Kyle of Lochalsh.<br /> <br /> Strome Ferry was the original terminus of the Dingwall and Skye Railway which opened in 1870. The line was worked by the Highland Railway which officially absorbed it in August 1880. Ferry services were run from here to a variety of mainland and island destinations. To begin with the ferries were run by the Dingwall and Skye Railway, then the Highland Railway and finally David MacBrayne.<br /> <br /> The line was extended to Kyle of Lochalsh in November 1897. In the early 1960s the spelling was changed to Stromeferry. It is still served by regular passenger services although it was closed to goods traffic in June 1964. A siding was built for the fabrication yard for oil platforms at Loch Kishorn which opened in 1975. The siding closed in the mid-1980s.