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TITLE
Falls of Coe, Glen Coe
EXTERNAL ID
PC_JMSTRACHAN_100
PLACENAME
Falls of Coe
DISTRICT
North Lorn
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ARGYLL: Lismore and Appin
PERIOD
1970s
CREATOR
JM Strachan
SOURCE
J I R Martin
ASSET ID
28954
KEYWORDS
Argyllshire
waterfalls
Falls of Coe, Glen Coe

This image shows the Falls of Coe, located in Glen Coe.

Glen Coe is synonymous with the Massacre of Glencoe MacDonalds on 13 February 1692. In 1689, James VII was deposed from the throne and replaced by William of Orange, although many clan chiefs remained loyal to James and the Stuart monarchy. In 1691, a deal was struck to provide an honourable indemnity to those Jacobite chiefs still loyal to James VII, who agreed to swear an oath of allegiance to William before 1 January 1692. Due to a number of factors which caused the delay, Alasdair MacIain, chief of the Glencoe MacDonalds, did not swear his oath until 5 January 1692.

Orders to carry out the attack on the MacDonalds of Glencoe can be traced directly to the Lord Advocate, Dalrymple of Stair. Dalrymple had previously had close links with James VII, and was anxious to be seen as loyal to William. On 1 February 1692, detachments of the Argyll Regiment under Captain Robert Campbell of Glenlyon arrived in Glencoe. Troops were ordered to attack on 13 February and about 40 of the clan were killed, including the chief, Alasdair MacIain. An unknown number died subsequently from exposure after escaping. The massacre is often thought of as a Campbell atrocity but, although Campbell of Glenlyon was of that clan, most of his troops were not.

The massacre undoubtedly deepened Jacobite sympathies in the western Highlands. In a parliamentary inquiry into the attack in July 1695, an unrepentant Dalrymple was given the majority of the blame for the massacre and dismissed from office.

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Falls of Coe, Glen Coe

ARGYLL: Lismore and Appin

1970s

Argyllshire; waterfalls

J I R Martin

This image shows the Falls of Coe, located in Glen Coe. <br /> <br /> Glen Coe is synonymous with the Massacre of Glencoe MacDonalds on 13 February 1692. In 1689, James VII was deposed from the throne and replaced by William of Orange, although many clan chiefs remained loyal to James and the Stuart monarchy. In 1691, a deal was struck to provide an honourable indemnity to those Jacobite chiefs still loyal to James VII, who agreed to swear an oath of allegiance to William before 1 January 1692. Due to a number of factors which caused the delay, Alasdair MacIain, chief of the Glencoe MacDonalds, did not swear his oath until 5 January 1692. <br /> <br /> Orders to carry out the attack on the MacDonalds of Glencoe can be traced directly to the Lord Advocate, Dalrymple of Stair. Dalrymple had previously had close links with James VII, and was anxious to be seen as loyal to William. On 1 February 1692, detachments of the Argyll Regiment under Captain Robert Campbell of Glenlyon arrived in Glencoe. Troops were ordered to attack on 13 February and about 40 of the clan were killed, including the chief, Alasdair MacIain. An unknown number died subsequently from exposure after escaping. The massacre is often thought of as a Campbell atrocity but, although Campbell of Glenlyon was of that clan, most of his troops were not. <br /> <br /> The massacre undoubtedly deepened Jacobite sympathies in the western Highlands. In a parliamentary inquiry into the attack in July 1695, an unrepentant Dalrymple was given the majority of the blame for the massacre and dismissed from office.