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TITLE
Red Deer
EXTERNAL ID
PC_JMSTRACHAN_322
CREATOR
JM Strachan
SOURCE
J I R Martin
ASSET ID
29127
KEYWORDS
winter scenes
snow
Red Deer

Most red deer in Britain can be found on the open moorlands of the Scottish Highlands and Islands. Although extinct in the Lowlands by the end of the 18th century, Highland numbers were increased with the subsequent development of the sport of deer stalking. The majority of the deer population live in open-hill habitats all year round although they tend to be smaller than those resident in woodland areas. For much of the year, male and female groups remain separate, feeding on grasses, rushes, and sedges in summer, and heather and blaeberry in winter.

Mating takes place from the end of September to November. Mature stags defend groups of hinds to prevent mating by competitors. During the 'rut', stags engage in roaring contests. This may escalate into physical locking of antlers and physical injury is not uncommon.

The sport of deer stalking was popular throughout the 19th century but it was given a royal seal of approval when Queen Victoria bought the Balmoral estate in 1852. Wealthy people began to buy or rent their own Highland estates and build great shooting lodges. These new landowners were keen to increase the numbers of deer as they believed this improved their chances of finding good trophy stags. Today deer stalking is used to remove old and weak deer from the herd.

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Red Deer

winter scenes; snow

J I R Martin

Most red deer in Britain can be found on the open moorlands of the Scottish Highlands and Islands. Although extinct in the Lowlands by the end of the 18th century, Highland numbers were increased with the subsequent development of the sport of deer stalking. The majority of the deer population live in open-hill habitats all year round although they tend to be smaller than those resident in woodland areas. For much of the year, male and female groups remain separate, feeding on grasses, rushes, and sedges in summer, and heather and blaeberry in winter. <br /> <br /> Mating takes place from the end of September to November. Mature stags defend groups of hinds to prevent mating by competitors. During the 'rut', stags engage in roaring contests. This may escalate into physical locking of antlers and physical injury is not uncommon. <br /> <br /> The sport of deer stalking was popular throughout the 19th century but it was given a royal seal of approval when Queen Victoria bought the Balmoral estate in 1852. Wealthy people began to buy or rent their own Highland estates and build great shooting lodges. These new landowners were keen to increase the numbers of deer as they believed this improved their chances of finding good trophy stags. Today deer stalking is used to remove old and weak deer from the herd.