Please Sign In | Register
Google pluspinterestShare on Stumble UponShare on RedditFacebookShare on Tumblr
TITLE
Chess Piece (Queen) at Woodlands Centre
EXTERNAL ID
PC_MACLEAN_HARRIS&LEWIS09_27
PLACENAME
Stornoway
DISTRICT
Lewis
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Stornoway
DATE OF IMAGE
8 July 2009
PERIOD
2000s
CREATOR
Clare Maclean
SOURCE
Clare Maclean
ASSET ID
29247
KEYWORDS
chess
games
recreation
fun
sculptures
archaeology
Chess Piece (Queen) at Woodlands Centre

The Lewis Chessmen were discovered sometime before April 1831 (when they were put on display by the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland) near Uig Bay on the Island of Lewis. Little is known about their origin or owners but most agree that they were very likely carved in Norway around 1150 - 1200 AD. They were mostly carved from walrus ivory and some appeared to have been stained red suggesting that the opposing sides were white and red instead of the white and black that is more common in chess today.

The pieces are all depictions on humans apart from the pawns which are obelisk shapes. It is believed that the pieces are from four, and possibly five, different sets. Eleven of the pieces are displayed in the National Museum of Scotland in Edinburgh and 82 are held by the British Museum in London which also lends pieces to other museums for travelling exhibits.

This wooden chess Queen is one of two carved pieces at the entrance to the Woodlands Centre car park in the ground of Lews Castle, Stornoway.

For guidance on the use of images and other content, please see the Terms and Conditions page.
High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
Powered by Capture

Chess Piece (Queen) at Woodlands Centre

ROSS: Stornoway

2000s

chess; games; recreation; fun; sculptures; archaeology

Clare Maclean

The Lewis Chessmen were discovered sometime before April 1831 (when they were put on display by the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland) near Uig Bay on the Island of Lewis. Little is known about their origin or owners but most agree that they were very likely carved in Norway around 1150 - 1200 AD. They were mostly carved from walrus ivory and some appeared to have been stained red suggesting that the opposing sides were white and red instead of the white and black that is more common in chess today.<br /> <br /> The pieces are all depictions on humans apart from the pawns which are obelisk shapes. It is believed that the pieces are from four, and possibly five, different sets. Eleven of the pieces are displayed in the National Museum of Scotland in Edinburgh and 82 are held by the British Museum in London which also lends pieces to other museums for travelling exhibits.<br /> <br /> This wooden chess Queen is one of two carved pieces at the entrance to the Woodlands Centre car park in the ground of Lews Castle, Stornoway.