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TITLE
Prince Charlie's Monument, Glenfinnan
EXTERNAL ID
PC_PRISCUS_BPC6428
PLACENAME
Glenfinnan
DISTRICT
Lochaber
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Arisaig and Moidart
PERIOD
1890s
CREATOR
George Washington Wilson
SOURCE
Mark Butterworth - Priscus
ASSET ID
29567
KEYWORDS
Prince Charles Edward Stuart
lochs
Shiel
Fort William
standard
silk
Tullibardine
Murray
monument
inscrition
Gaelic
Latin
Macdonald
Glenaladale
motto
manifesto
Chevalier
Rome
Corryarrack
John Cope
Dalwhinnie
Stirling
clans
Inverness
Prince Charlie's Monument, Glenfinnan

This photograph was taken by Scottish photographer George Washington Wilson (1823-93) and was used to illustrate talks he gave on Highland history. The following text is taken from Washington Wilson's own lecture notes on the Jacobite Rising of 1745-46.

In Glenfinnan near the top of Loch Shiel about 15 miles west of Fort-William, the standard of the Stuarts had been unfurled by the aged Tullibardine.

"Oh, high-minded Murray the exile, the dear,
In the blush of the dawning the standard uprear
Wide, wide on the winds of the north let it fly
Like the sun's latest flash when the tempest is nigh"

A column erected by Macdonald of Glenaladale and bearing an inscription in English, Gaelic and Latin stands on the spot. The standard was of red silk with a white space in the centre on which some weeks afterwards the celebrated motto "Tandem triumphans" was inscribed. Tullibardine read aloud the manifesto of the old Chevalier, dated Dec., 1743, from Rome, promising redress of grievances and appointing his son, Prince Charles, his regent. The Highland army seized the pass of Corryarrack. The Prince remarked as he put on his new Highland brogues, "I shall be up with Mr. Cope before these are unloosed."

At a council of war Sir John discussed the situation. He could not remain at Dalwhinnie, which he had now reached. He dared not attack the Highland host at Corryarrack, he could not retire to Stirling, as his orders were "to advance," and so he determined to push on to Inverness, to join the well affected Clans, and thus draw the enemy after him, for he never dreamt that they would march southwards with so large a force in their rear.

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Prince Charlie's Monument, Glenfinnan

INVERNESS: Arisaig and Moidart

1890s

Prince Charles Edward Stuart; lochs; Shiel; Fort William; standard; silk; Tullibardine; Murray; monument; inscrition; Gaelic; Latin; Macdonald; Glenaladale; motto; manifesto; Chevalier; Rome; Corryarrack; John Cope; Dalwhinnie; Stirling; clans; Inverness

Mark Butterworth - Priscus

Imaging the Past - Prince Charlie and the '45

This photograph was taken by Scottish photographer George Washington Wilson (1823-93) and was used to illustrate talks he gave on Highland history. The following text is taken from Washington Wilson's own lecture notes on the Jacobite Rising of 1745-46.<br /> <br /> In Glenfinnan near the top of Loch Shiel about 15 miles west of Fort-William, the standard of the Stuarts had been unfurled by the aged Tullibardine.<br /> <br /> "Oh, high-minded Murray the exile, the dear,<br /> In the blush of the dawning the standard uprear<br /> Wide, wide on the winds of the north let it fly<br /> Like the sun's latest flash when the tempest is nigh"<br /> <br /> A column erected by Macdonald of Glenaladale and bearing an inscription in English, Gaelic and Latin stands on the spot. The standard was of red silk with a white space in the centre on which some weeks afterwards the celebrated motto "Tandem triumphans" was inscribed. Tullibardine read aloud the manifesto of the old Chevalier, dated Dec., 1743, from Rome, promising redress of grievances and appointing his son, Prince Charles, his regent. The Highland army seized the pass of Corryarrack. The Prince remarked as he put on his new Highland brogues, "I shall be up with Mr. Cope before these are unloosed."<br /> <br /> At a council of war Sir John discussed the situation. He could not remain at Dalwhinnie, which he had now reached. He dared not attack the Highland host at Corryarrack, he could not retire to Stirling, as his orders were "to advance," and so he determined to push on to Inverness, to join the well affected Clans, and thus draw the enemy after him, for he never dreamt that they would march southwards with so large a force in their rear.