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TITLE
North Ford, Benbecula
EXTERNAL ID
PC_PRISCUS_SCO5292
PLACENAME
North Ford
DISTRICT
South Uist
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: South Uist
PERIOD
1890s
CREATOR
George Washington Wilson
SOURCE
Mark Butterworth - Priscus
ASSET ID
29577
KEYWORDS
Noth Uist
islands
sands
floods
shell fish
North Ford, Benbecula

This photograph was taken by Scottish photographer George Washington Wilson (1823-93) and was used to illustrate talks he gave on Highland history. The following description is taken from Washington Wilson's own lecture notes.

South of North Uist, and separated from it by what is called North Ford, lies the Island of Benbecula. The distance between the Islands is four miles, and on certain days numbers of men, women, and children may be seen hurrying across the wet sands at low water. It is considered perilous to deviate from the recognised track, as at spring tides and with certain winds the flood may overtake those unacquainted. On these extensive stretches of sand, and all around the coast, large quantities of shell fish are gathered and sent to the southern markets, for which the poor people receive a very small amount: for by far the greater portion of it is swallowed up in rates for transit and commission on sales.

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North Ford, Benbecula

INVERNESS: South Uist

1890s

Noth Uist; islands; sands; floods; shell fish

Mark Butterworth - Priscus

Imaging the Past

This photograph was taken by Scottish photographer George Washington Wilson (1823-93) and was used to illustrate talks he gave on Highland history. The following description is taken from Washington Wilson's own lecture notes.<br /> <br /> South of North Uist, and separated from it by what is called North Ford, lies the Island of Benbecula. The distance between the Islands is four miles, and on certain days numbers of men, women, and children may be seen hurrying across the wet sands at low water. It is considered perilous to deviate from the recognised track, as at spring tides and with certain winds the flood may overtake those unacquainted. On these extensive stretches of sand, and all around the coast, large quantities of shell fish are gathered and sent to the southern markets, for which the poor people receive a very small amount: for by far the greater portion of it is swallowed up in rates for transit and commission on sales.