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TITLE
Fingals Cave, Staffa
EXTERNAL ID
PC_PRISCUS_SCO5294
PLACENAME
Staffa
DISTRICT
Mull
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ARGYLL: Kilninian and Kilmore
PERIOD
1890s
CREATOR
George Washington Wilson
SOURCE
Mark Butterworth - Priscus
ASSET ID
29578
KEYWORDS
islands
George Washington Wilson
Queen Victoria
Mull
basalt
volcanoes
lava
Giant's Causeway
Great Face
Joseph Banks
Mendelssohn
Fion mac Cumhail
Finn MacCool
Hebrides
Turner
Wordsworth
Scott
Verne
National Nature Reserve
National Trust
Fingals Cave, Staffa

This photograph shows Fingal's Cave on the small, uninhabited island of Staffa. It was taken by George Washington Wilson (1823 - 1893) an Aberdeen-based photographer who travelled extensively in Scotland, and abroad, taking landscape photographs with the aid of a portable darkroom. He photographed Queen Victoria and was commissioned by her to record the construction of Balmoral.

Staffa, situated northwest of the Island of Mull, is famous for its hexagonal basalt columns, formed millions of years ago by volcanic activity, and is part of the same ancient lava flow that formed the Giant's Causeway in Northern Ireland. In Fingal's Cave the columns on the Great Face are 17 metres (65 feet) high. The naturalist Sir Joseph Banks "discovered" it in 1772 and it was named after the Irish hero, Fion mac Cumhail. Felix Mendelssohn was moved by the echoes of the sea in this great, natural cathedral to write his celebrated "Hebrides Overture".

An inspiration to writers and artists, Fingal's Cave has had many famous visitors including Queen Victoria, Sir Walter Scott, Sir John Keats, William Wordsworth, Jules Verne and J.M.W.Turner, who painted it. The island is also known for its bird life and is now a National Nature Reserve owned by the National Trust for Scotland.

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Fingals Cave, Staffa

ARGYLL: Kilninian and Kilmore

1890s

islands; George Washington Wilson; Queen Victoria; Mull; basalt; volcanoes; lava; Giant's Causeway; Great Face; Joseph Banks; Mendelssohn; Fion mac Cumhail; Finn MacCool; Hebrides; Turner; Wordsworth; Scott; Verne; National Nature Reserve; National Trust

Mark Butterworth - Priscus

Imaging the Past

This photograph shows Fingal's Cave on the small, uninhabited island of Staffa. It was taken by George Washington Wilson (1823 - 1893) an Aberdeen-based photographer who travelled extensively in Scotland, and abroad, taking landscape photographs with the aid of a portable darkroom. He photographed Queen Victoria and was commissioned by her to record the construction of Balmoral.<br /> <br /> Staffa, situated northwest of the Island of Mull, is famous for its hexagonal basalt columns, formed millions of years ago by volcanic activity, and is part of the same ancient lava flow that formed the Giant's Causeway in Northern Ireland. In Fingal's Cave the columns on the Great Face are 17 metres (65 feet) high. The naturalist Sir Joseph Banks "discovered" it in 1772 and it was named after the Irish hero, Fion mac Cumhail. Felix Mendelssohn was moved by the echoes of the sea in this great, natural cathedral to write his celebrated "Hebrides Overture". <br /> <br /> An inspiration to writers and artists, Fingal's Cave has had many famous visitors including Queen Victoria, Sir Walter Scott, Sir John Keats, William Wordsworth, Jules Verne and J.M.W.Turner, who painted it. The island is also known for its bird life and is now a National Nature Reserve owned by the National Trust for Scotland.