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TITLE
Loch Corruisk, Skye
EXTERNAL ID
PC_PRISCUS_SCO5393
PLACENAME
Loch Coruisk
DISTRICT
Skye
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Strath
PERIOD
1890s
CREATOR
George Washington Wilson
SOURCE
Mark Butterworth - Priscus
ASSET ID
29586
KEYWORDS
Skye
lochs
precipices
earthquakes
Scavaig
ravens
eagles
Sir Walter Scott
Loch Corruisk, Skye

This photograph was taken by Scottish photographer George Washington Wilson (1823-93) and was used to illustrate talks he gave on Highland history. The following description is taken from Washington Wilson's own lecture notes.

Here we have one of the most savage scenes of desolation in Britain. Loch Coruisk, meaning in Gaelic "The Kettle of Water," not at all an inapt description; conceive a large lake filled with dark green water, girt with torn and shattered precipices, the bases of which are strewn with ruin since an earthquake passed that way, and whose summits jag the sky with grisly splinter and peak. There is no motion here, save the white vapour streaming from the abyss and curling round the peaks that still bear traces of the winter snow. The utter silence weighs like a burden, for excepting the ripple of the waves on the shores of the Loch Scavaig or the croak of the raven far overhead, there is nothing to break the stillness. The whole scene is one of terrible barrenness and solitude. Here the eagle survives unmolested, and may be seen spreading his wings majestically almost any day. The lake is but a few feet above sea level, into which

"A wild stream with headlong shock
Comes brawling down a bed of rock
To mingle with the main" - Scott

To ascend is a much more difficult task, and, as you must of necessity pick your way over huge boulders, well worn stones, and bogs, it should be done very leisurely, so as to allow of time to enjoy the view to be got of - (Loch Scavaig)

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Loch Corruisk, Skye

INVERNESS: Strath

1890s

Skye; lochs; precipices; earthquakes; Scavaig; ravens; eagles; Sir Walter Scott

Mark Butterworth - Priscus

Imaging the Past

This photograph was taken by Scottish photographer George Washington Wilson (1823-93) and was used to illustrate talks he gave on Highland history. The following description is taken from Washington Wilson's own lecture notes.<br /> <br /> Here we have one of the most savage scenes of desolation in Britain. Loch Coruisk, meaning in Gaelic "The Kettle of Water," not at all an inapt description; conceive a large lake filled with dark green water, girt with torn and shattered precipices, the bases of which are strewn with ruin since an earthquake passed that way, and whose summits jag the sky with grisly splinter and peak. There is no motion here, save the white vapour streaming from the abyss and curling round the peaks that still bear traces of the winter snow. The utter silence weighs like a burden, for excepting the ripple of the waves on the shores of the Loch Scavaig or the croak of the raven far overhead, there is nothing to break the stillness. The whole scene is one of terrible barrenness and solitude. Here the eagle survives unmolested, and may be seen spreading his wings majestically almost any day. The lake is but a few feet above sea level, into which<br /> <br /> "A wild stream with headlong shock<br /> Comes brawling down a bed of rock<br /> To mingle with the main" - Scott<br /> <br /> To ascend is a much more difficult task, and, as you must of necessity pick your way over huge boulders, well worn stones, and bogs, it should be done very leisurely, so as to allow of time to enjoy the view to be got of - (Loch Scavaig)