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TITLE
Making kelp, South Uist
EXTERNAL ID
PC_PRISCUS_SCO6006
PLACENAME
South Uist
DISTRICT
South Uist
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: South Uist
PERIOD
1890s
CREATOR
George Washington Wilson
SOURCE
Mark Butterworth - Priscus
ASSET ID
29587
KEYWORDS
Hebrides
occupations
factors
rent
crofts
crofting
Duke of Argyle
industries
seaweed
Making kelp, South Uist

This photograph was taken by Scottish photographer George Washington Wilson (1823-93) and was used to illustrate talks he gave on Highland history. The following description is taken from Washington Wilson's own lecture notes.

The kelp industry of the Hebrides is not as important now as it was some years ago. Yet the making of it is one of the chief occupations of very large number of the inhabitants of these Islands, as usually the factor accepts it on payment for rent; the proprietors as a rule claim a heavy royalty on every ton of it manufactured, besides the rent charged by them for the crofts, etc. The Duke of Argyle is no exception to this order of things. In the manufacture of this staple industry, many of the poor creatures have to leave home and dwell in huts partly dug into the earth and partly built of sod. In these they exist rather than live, while they are preparing the season's necessary quantity of this material. The process of making it consists in gathering, drying, and burning the sea weed, the residue constitutes the kelp.

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Making kelp, South Uist

INVERNESS: South Uist

1890s

Hebrides; occupations; factors; rent; crofts; crofting; Duke of Argyle; industries; seaweed

Mark Butterworth - Priscus

Imaging the Past

This photograph was taken by Scottish photographer George Washington Wilson (1823-93) and was used to illustrate talks he gave on Highland history. The following description is taken from Washington Wilson's own lecture notes.<br /> <br /> The kelp industry of the Hebrides is not as important now as it was some years ago. Yet the making of it is one of the chief occupations of very large number of the inhabitants of these Islands, as usually the factor accepts it on payment for rent; the proprietors as a rule claim a heavy royalty on every ton of it manufactured, besides the rent charged by them for the crofts, etc. The Duke of Argyle is no exception to this order of things. In the manufacture of this staple industry, many of the poor creatures have to leave home and dwell in huts partly dug into the earth and partly built of sod. In these they exist rather than live, while they are preparing the season's necessary quantity of this material. The process of making it consists in gathering, drying, and burning the sea weed, the residue constitutes the kelp.