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TITLE
Tobermory
EXTERNAL ID
PC_PRISCUS_WCS6359
PLACENAME
Tobermory
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ARGYLL: Kilninian and Kilmore
PERIOD
1890s
CREATOR
George Washington Wilson
SOURCE
Mark Butterworth - Priscus
ASSET ID
29594
KEYWORDS
steamers
tax
Ru-na-Gual
lighthouses
Bloody Bay
Alastair Crotach
Dunvegan
Macleod
battles
Ardnamurchan
Cape of the Great Seas
Atlantic
islands
Coll
Muke
Muck
mountains
Eigg, Rum
Coolin
Cuillins
Skye
Tobermory

This photograph was taken by Scottish photographer George Washington Wilson (1823-93) and was used to illustrate talks he gave on Highland history. The following description is taken from Washington Wilson's own lecture notes.

As the steamer enters the beautiful bay of Tobermory the little town, with its half-circle of white houses, backed by hill terraces, on which pretty villas are perched and flanked by sombre pine plantations, is a pleasant picture, and takes heart and eye at once. The steamer is usually detained here for a considerable time unloading cargo. This operation, however, becomes wearisome, and it is preferable to pay the landing tax and have a look around and see if on closer examination the town maintains its prepossessing character; if not, there are beautiful sylvan walks and waterfalls beyond the clatter of the steam cran and the shouting of the Gaelic-speaking porters. After leaving Tobermory, the Ru-na-Gaul lighthouse is passed, and to the westward of this lies the Bloody Bay, where "Alastair Crotach" of Dunvegan, the hunchback son of William, chief of the Macleods, was slain in battle, in 1493. The next point of interest is Ardnamurchan point or the Cape of the Great Seas, and the most westerly land of Great Britain, when on a breezy day the swell of the great Atlantic tests the seaworthiness of many a tourist. West from the point lies the low Island of Coll, to the northwest Muke, with the peaked mountains of the Island of Rum, and the long wall of the Scuir of Eigg. Between the Islands of Eigg and Rum may be seen the many crests of the Coolin mountains of Skye.

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Tobermory

ARGYLL: Kilninian and Kilmore

1890s

steamers; tax; Ru-na-Gual; lighthouses; Bloody Bay; Alastair Crotach; Dunvegan; Macleod; battles; Ardnamurchan; Cape of the Great Seas; Atlantic; islands; Coll; Muke; Muck; mountains; Eigg, Rum; Coolin; Cuillins; Skye;

Mark Butterworth - Priscus

Imaging the Past

This photograph was taken by Scottish photographer George Washington Wilson (1823-93) and was used to illustrate talks he gave on Highland history. The following description is taken from Washington Wilson's own lecture notes.<br /> <br /> As the steamer enters the beautiful bay of Tobermory the little town, with its half-circle of white houses, backed by hill terraces, on which pretty villas are perched and flanked by sombre pine plantations, is a pleasant picture, and takes heart and eye at once. The steamer is usually detained here for a considerable time unloading cargo. This operation, however, becomes wearisome, and it is preferable to pay the landing tax and have a look around and see if on closer examination the town maintains its prepossessing character; if not, there are beautiful sylvan walks and waterfalls beyond the clatter of the steam cran and the shouting of the Gaelic-speaking porters. After leaving Tobermory, the Ru-na-Gaul lighthouse is passed, and to the westward of this lies the Bloody Bay, where "Alastair Crotach" of Dunvegan, the hunchback son of William, chief of the Macleods, was slain in battle, in 1493. The next point of interest is Ardnamurchan point or the Cape of the Great Seas, and the most westerly land of Great Britain, when on a breezy day the swell of the great Atlantic tests the seaworthiness of many a tourist. West from the point lies the low Island of Coll, to the northwest Muke, with the peaked mountains of the Island of Rum, and the long wall of the Scuir of Eigg. Between the Islands of Eigg and Rum may be seen the many crests of the Coolin mountains of Skye.