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TITLE
Armadale Castle
EXTERNAL ID
PC_PRISCUS_WCS6361
PLACENAME
Armadale
DISTRICT
Skye
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Sleat
PERIOD
1890s
CREATOR
George Washington Wilson
SOURCE
Mark Butterworth - Priscus
ASSET ID
29596
KEYWORDS
Coolins
Cuillins
Cuillin
sounds
Sleat
steamers
castles
Lord of the Isles
Macdonald
Skye
crofters
crofting
cran
oats
meal
flour
potatoes
seaweed
MacBrayne
Armadale Castle

This photograph was taken by Scottish photographer George Washington Wilson (1823-93) and was used to illustrate talks he gave on Highland history. The following description is taken from Washington Wilson's own lecture notes.

After leaving Eigg the peaks of the Coolins stand out very clearly, and just before entering the Sound of Sleat the steamer makes a call opposite Armadale Castle, the residence of the lineal descendant of the Lord of the Isles - Lord Macdonald. This castle is surrounded by plantations not surpassed by any in the country, and when through the openings of these noble trees you obtain a glimpse of the Castle itself, a handsome, modern looking building, rising from sweeps of shaven lawn, you find it hard to believe this is Skye, and that you are within a few miles, northward, of a long stretch of moory desolation, while about a mile and a half distant, in an opposite direction, are a number of miserable crofters' homes, surrounded by very poor land, from which the tenants, with the aid of the crooked spade and such sea weed as they can carry from the shore, manage to raise a little oats and potatoes. Here, as at any other places of the steamer's calls, communication with the shore is maintained by ferry boats, under the care of Mr. MacBrayne's agent, who is also the local time table and cyclopaedia for all information in connection with the steamers. After leaving Oban, many calls are made in the same manner, namely, a boat is brought alongside before you are aware, and made fast, a few Gaelic monosyllables are exchanged, then the clatter of the steam cran commences, and goes on, while boxes, barrels, bags of oats, meal, flour, and potatoes are tumbled into it in a most indiscriminate fashion until a stranger imagines the boat must sink. Suddenly a few human beings crown the already apparently overloaded boat, and, after one or two Gaelic phrases are exchanged, the screw commences moving, and very soon the small boat and its load is left behind to be rowed ashore.

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Armadale Castle

INVERNESS: Sleat

1890s

Coolins; Cuillins; Cuillin; sounds; Sleat; steamers; castles; Lord of the Isles; Macdonald; Skye; crofters; crofting; cran; oats; meal; flour; potatoes; seaweed; MacBrayne

Mark Butterworth - Priscus

Imaging the Past

This photograph was taken by Scottish photographer George Washington Wilson (1823-93) and was used to illustrate talks he gave on Highland history. The following description is taken from Washington Wilson's own lecture notes.<br /> <br /> After leaving Eigg the peaks of the Coolins stand out very clearly, and just before entering the Sound of Sleat the steamer makes a call opposite Armadale Castle, the residence of the lineal descendant of the Lord of the Isles - Lord Macdonald. This castle is surrounded by plantations not surpassed by any in the country, and when through the openings of these noble trees you obtain a glimpse of the Castle itself, a handsome, modern looking building, rising from sweeps of shaven lawn, you find it hard to believe this is Skye, and that you are within a few miles, northward, of a long stretch of moory desolation, while about a mile and a half distant, in an opposite direction, are a number of miserable crofters' homes, surrounded by very poor land, from which the tenants, with the aid of the crooked spade and such sea weed as they can carry from the shore, manage to raise a little oats and potatoes. Here, as at any other places of the steamer's calls, communication with the shore is maintained by ferry boats, under the care of Mr. MacBrayne's agent, who is also the local time table and cyclopaedia for all information in connection with the steamers. After leaving Oban, many calls are made in the same manner, namely, a boat is brought alongside before you are aware, and made fast, a few Gaelic monosyllables are exchanged, then the clatter of the steam cran commences, and goes on, while boxes, barrels, bags of oats, meal, flour, and potatoes are tumbled into it in a most indiscriminate fashion until a stranger imagines the boat must sink. Suddenly a few human beings crown the already apparently overloaded boat, and, after one or two Gaelic phrases are exchanged, the screw commences moving, and very soon the small boat and its load is left behind to be rowed ashore.