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TITLE
Portree, Skye
EXTERNAL ID
PC_PRISCUS_WCS6364
PLACENAME
Portree
DISTRICT
Skye
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Portree
PERIOD
1890s
CREATOR
George Washington Wilson
SOURCE
Mark Butterworth - Priscus
ASSET ID
29598
KEYWORDS
sounds
steamers
headlands
towns
ports
King's Port
piers
houses
highlanders
Skye
tourists
crofters
agitation
Portree, Skye

This photograph was taken by Scottish photographer George Washington Wilson (1823-93) and was used to illustrate talks he gave on Highland history. The following description is taken from Washington Wilson's own lecture notes.

After proceeding a short distance up the Sound the steamer passes within the imposing headlands that guard the approach to Portree, i.e., the King's Port. The town, as seen from the pier, folds two irregular ranges of white houses, the one range rising steeply above the other, around the noble bay, the entrance to which is sheltered by rocky precipices. At a little distance the houses are as white as shells, and in summer they are set in the greenest of foliage, the effect is strikingly pretty.

At the pier the impenetrable character of the true Highlander may be noticed. The arrival of the steamer being the event of the day, most of those who have nothing particular to do congregate on the pier, and they would not unnaturally be expected to show some interest in this event; but no! the Highlander would as soon think of turning his back on his foe as of expressing astonishment at anything.

To the visitor the place does not seem especially remarkable, but everything is relative in this world, and Portree is the capital of Skye. The tourist seldom lingers long in the town, but within a short distance of it finds many subjects that, if not at all striking, are at least very interesting.

The crofter agitation having excited interest throughout the country without disseminating a corresponding amount of reliable information, a few remarks here regarding the crofters and their homes may be interesting.

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Portree, Skye

INVERNESS: Portree

1890s

sounds; steamers; headlands; towns; ports; King's Port; piers; houses; highlanders; Skye; tourists; crofters; agitation

Mark Butterworth - Priscus

Imaging the Past

This photograph was taken by Scottish photographer George Washington Wilson (1823-93) and was used to illustrate talks he gave on Highland history. The following description is taken from Washington Wilson's own lecture notes.<br /> <br /> After proceeding a short distance up the Sound the steamer passes within the imposing headlands that guard the approach to Portree, i.e., the King's Port. The town, as seen from the pier, folds two irregular ranges of white houses, the one range rising steeply above the other, around the noble bay, the entrance to which is sheltered by rocky precipices. At a little distance the houses are as white as shells, and in summer they are set in the greenest of foliage, the effect is strikingly pretty.<br /> <br /> At the pier the impenetrable character of the true Highlander may be noticed. The arrival of the steamer being the event of the day, most of those who have nothing particular to do congregate on the pier, and they would not unnaturally be expected to show some interest in this event; but no! the Highlander would as soon think of turning his back on his foe as of expressing astonishment at anything.<br /> <br /> To the visitor the place does not seem especially remarkable, but everything is relative in this world, and Portree is the capital of Skye. The tourist seldom lingers long in the town, but within a short distance of it finds many subjects that, if not at all striking, are at least very interesting.<br /> <br /> The crofter agitation having excited interest throughout the country without disseminating a corresponding amount of reliable information, a few remarks here regarding the crofters and their homes may be interesting.