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TITLE
Spinning Wool, Skye
EXTERNAL ID
PC_PRISCUS_WCS6367
DISTRICT
Skye
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS
PERIOD
1890s
CREATOR
George Washington Wilson
SOURCE
Mark Butterworth - Priscus
ASSET ID
29601
KEYWORDS
Skye
spinning
shops
factories
home spun
sheep
mutton
wool
weavers
weaving
looms
garments
Spinning Wool, Skye

This photograph was taken by Scottish photographer George Washington Wilson (1823-93) and was used to illustrate talks he gave on Highland history. The following description is taken from Washington Wilson's own lecture notes.

The spinning wheel, once seen in every Highland hut, is not now so general, even in Skye, as in bygone days. Shops are more common now than ever they were, and good clothing can be had from factories far cheaper than they can be made "home-spun," provided there be any cash in hand.

In many cases the sheep, because of "inbreeding," are depreciating both in mutton and wool, and it is not unusual in the spring to see many of them miserably lean and almost naked. Nevertheless, there remains sufficient vitality in many cases to produce good wool, which the poor people spin, and weavers are seen in every township plying at the loom weaving the comfortable "home-made" garments for the people.

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High Life Highland is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland No. SC407011 and is a registered Scottish charity No. SC042593
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Spinning Wool, Skye

INVERNESS

1890s

Skye; spinning; shops; factories; home spun; sheep; mutton; wool; weavers; weaving; looms; garments

Mark Butterworth - Priscus

Imaging the Past

This photograph was taken by Scottish photographer George Washington Wilson (1823-93) and was used to illustrate talks he gave on Highland history. The following description is taken from Washington Wilson's own lecture notes.<br /> <br /> The spinning wheel, once seen in every Highland hut, is not now so general, even in Skye, as in bygone days. Shops are more common now than ever they were, and good clothing can be had from factories far cheaper than they can be made "home-spun," provided there be any cash in hand.<br /> <br /> In many cases the sheep, because of "inbreeding," are depreciating both in mutton and wool, and it is not unusual in the spring to see many of them miserably lean and almost naked. Nevertheless, there remains sufficient vitality in many cases to produce good wool, which the poor people spin, and weavers are seen in every township plying at the loom weaving the comfortable "home-made" garments for the people.