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TITLE
Skye Octogenarians
EXTERNAL ID
PC_PRISCUS_WCS6368
DISTRICT
Skye
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS
PERIOD
1890s
CREATOR
George Washington Wilson
SOURCE
Mark Butterworth - Priscus
ASSET ID
29602
KEYWORDS
Skye
sanitation
worthies
Fisherfield
Macdonald
Macleod
Celtic
Norse
Lord of the Isles
kings
marriage
quarrels
dirks
castles
Dunvegan
drawbridges
dungeons
Skye Octogenarians

This photograph was taken by Scottish photographer George Washington Wilson (1823-93) and was used to illustrate talks he gave on Highland history. The following description is taken from Washington Wilson's own lecture notes.

Life in the Highlands, notwithstanding the neglect of sanitary laws, is not as unhealthy after all, if we may judge by the number of old people to be seen going about. The two worthies, both over eighty years of age, and living at Fisherfield, Portree, are genuine specimens of true, noble, generous, and hospitable Highlanders; this latter trait is very noticeable, among the old people, and, although they are shy toward strangers, any one who will take the trouble to become acquainted with them, and go in and out among them, will find much that is worth imitating.

The most important names in Skye are Macdonald and Macleod. Both are of great antiquity, and it is as difficult to discover the source of either in history as it is to discover the source of the Nile in the deserts of Central Africa. Macdonald is understood to be of pure Celtic origin. Macleod was originally a Norseman. Macdonald was the Lord of the Isles, and more than once crossed swords with the Scottish kings. The two families intermarried often, and quarrelled oftener. They put marriage rings on each other's fingers, and dirks in each other's hearts. Lord Macdonald has his modern castle at Armadale, while Macleod has his old eyrie at Dunvegan with its drawbridge and dungeons.

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Skye Octogenarians

INVERNESS

1890s

Skye; sanitation; worthies; Fisherfield; Macdonald; Macleod; Celtic; Norse; Lord of the Isles; kings; marriage; quarrels; dirks; castles; Dunvegan; drawbridges; dungeons

Mark Butterworth - Priscus

Imaging the Past

This photograph was taken by Scottish photographer George Washington Wilson (1823-93) and was used to illustrate talks he gave on Highland history. The following description is taken from Washington Wilson's own lecture notes.<br /> <br /> Life in the Highlands, notwithstanding the neglect of sanitary laws, is not as unhealthy after all, if we may judge by the number of old people to be seen going about. The two worthies, both over eighty years of age, and living at Fisherfield, Portree, are genuine specimens of true, noble, generous, and hospitable Highlanders; this latter trait is very noticeable, among the old people, and, although they are shy toward strangers, any one who will take the trouble to become acquainted with them, and go in and out among them, will find much that is worth imitating.<br /> <br /> The most important names in Skye are Macdonald and Macleod. Both are of great antiquity, and it is as difficult to discover the source of either in history as it is to discover the source of the Nile in the deserts of Central Africa. Macdonald is understood to be of pure Celtic origin. Macleod was originally a Norseman. Macdonald was the Lord of the Isles, and more than once crossed swords with the Scottish kings. The two families intermarried often, and quarrelled oftener. They put marriage rings on each other's fingers, and dirks in each other's hearts. Lord Macdonald has his modern castle at Armadale, while Macleod has his old eyrie at Dunvegan with its drawbridge and dungeons.