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TITLE
Girl with Creel
EXTERNAL ID
PC_PRISCUS_WCS6373
DISTRICT
Skye
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS
PERIOD
1890s
CREATOR
George Washington Wilson
SOURCE
Mark Butterworth - Priscus
ASSET ID
29607
KEYWORDS
Skye
creels
women
seaweed
cattle
fertilizer
horses
Girl with Creel

This photograph was taken by Scottish photographer George Washington Wilson (1823-93) and was used to illustrate talks he gave on Highland history. The following description is taken from Washington Wilson's own lecture notes.

The women in the Highlands do a heavy share of the labour in the spring, by carrying in creels sea weed, which is almost their only manure. Most of their cattle graze out all the year round; besides they are not careful to look after cattle droppings, which a practical husbandman considers very valuable. Consequently the sea weed is valuable as a fertilizer throughout the Hebrides. Certain portions of the inshore are set apart for particular districts, these are shorn at regular intervals; while on the west side of the Islands large quantities of sea weed can be gathered after a storm, and women may be seen climbing up very steep precipices, with loads enough for a horse, and it is peculiarly noticeable that, when a man engages in this work, he leads a horse with panniers attached, and filling these with sea weed the crofter marches by the animal's side, with his hands in his pockets to keep warm.

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Girl with Creel

INVERNESS

1890s

Skye; creels; women; seaweed; cattle; fertilizer; horses

Mark Butterworth - Priscus

Imaging the Past

This photograph was taken by Scottish photographer George Washington Wilson (1823-93) and was used to illustrate talks he gave on Highland history. The following description is taken from Washington Wilson's own lecture notes.<br /> <br /> The women in the Highlands do a heavy share of the labour in the spring, by carrying in creels sea weed, which is almost their only manure. Most of their cattle graze out all the year round; besides they are not careful to look after cattle droppings, which a practical husbandman considers very valuable. Consequently the sea weed is valuable as a fertilizer throughout the Hebrides. Certain portions of the inshore are set apart for particular districts, these are shorn at regular intervals; while on the west side of the Islands large quantities of sea weed can be gathered after a storm, and women may be seen climbing up very steep precipices, with loads enough for a horse, and it is peculiarly noticeable that, when a man engages in this work, he leads a horse with panniers attached, and filling these with sea weed the crofter marches by the animal's side, with his hands in his pockets to keep warm.