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TITLE
Sgurr nan Gillean, Skye
EXTERNAL ID
PC_PRISCUS_WCS6377
DISTRICT
Skye
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS
PERIOD
1890s
CREATOR
George Washington Wilson
SOURCE
Mark Butterworth - Priscus
ASSET ID
29610
KEYWORDS
Skye
hotels
lochs
Coruisk
Marsco
scurr
Sgurr-nan-Gillean
Coolin
Coolins
Cuillin
Cuillins
Sligachan
Harta Corrie
Loat o'Corrie
Lota Corrie
abyss
burns
gorges
Sgurr nan Gillean, Skye

This photograph was taken by Scottish photographer George Washington Wilson (1823-93) and was used to illustrate talks he gave on Highland history. The following description is taken from Washington Wilson's own lecture notes:

"From the Hotel the favourite walk is along the glen to Loch Coruisk. About midway through Glen Sligachan you skirt the base of Marsgow, that huge and isolated red Coolin - contrasting with the black and rugged outline of Scuir-na-gilleann that bounds the glen on your right. Round the eastern flank of the Scuir is the deep gorge of the Hart o'Corrie, running into the depths of the black Coolins, and leading to the Loat o'Corrie - a stony abyss on the S.W. face of Scuir-na-gilleann, described as perfectly terrible in its grimness. Down this deep gorge runs the Sligachan burn, a stream whose marvellous transparency seems to impart a brilliancy to then well-worn stones of various colours that form its bed, such as no mosaic work could possibly surpass."


Until the 19th century the Cuillin were regarded as unclimbable. The first recorded ascent of a Cuillin peak was in 1836, when the scientist James Forbes and local forester Duncan MacIntyre, successfully climbed Sgurr nan Gillean by its south-east ridge. In 1845, they pair returned to climb Bruach na Frithe, and made a second ascent of Sgurr nan Gillean by its trickier west ridge.

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Sgurr nan Gillean, Skye

INVERNESS

1890s

Skye; hotels; lochs; Coruisk; Marsco; scurr; Sgurr-nan-Gillean; Coolin; Coolins; Cuillin; Cuillins; Sligachan; Harta Corrie; Loat o'Corrie; Lota Corrie; abyss; burns; gorges

Mark Butterworth - Priscus

Imaging the Past

This photograph was taken by Scottish photographer George Washington Wilson (1823-93) and was used to illustrate talks he gave on Highland history. The following description is taken from Washington Wilson's own lecture notes:<br /> <br /> "From the Hotel the favourite walk is along the glen to Loch Coruisk. About midway through Glen Sligachan you skirt the base of Marsgow, that huge and isolated red Coolin - contrasting with the black and rugged outline of Scuir-na-gilleann that bounds the glen on your right. Round the eastern flank of the Scuir is the deep gorge of the Hart o'Corrie, running into the depths of the black Coolins, and leading to the Loat o'Corrie - a stony abyss on the S.W. face of Scuir-na-gilleann, described as perfectly terrible in its grimness. Down this deep gorge runs the Sligachan burn, a stream whose marvellous transparency seems to impart a brilliancy to then well-worn stones of various colours that form its bed, such as no mosaic work could possibly surpass."<br /> <br /> <br /> Until the 19th century the Cuillin were regarded as unclimbable. The first recorded ascent of a Cuillin peak was in 1836, when the scientist James Forbes and local forester Duncan MacIntyre, successfully climbed Sgurr nan Gillean by its south-east ridge. In 1845, they pair returned to climb Bruach na Frithe, and made a second ascent of Sgurr nan Gillean by its trickier west ridge.