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TITLE
Blaven
EXTERNAL ID
PC_PRISCUS_WCS6378
PLACENAME
Blaven
DISTRICT
Skye
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Strath
PERIOD
1890s
CREATOR
George Washington Wilson
SOURCE
Mark Butterworth - Priscus
ASSET ID
29611
KEYWORDS
Skye
Marsgow
Marsco
Bla Bheinn
Drumhain
Druim-nan-ramh
eagles
ravens
Coolin
Coolins
Cuillin
Cuillins
Rum
Rhum
lochs
mountains
Coruisk
Blaven

This photograph was taken by Scottish photographer George Washington Wilson (1823-93) and was used to illustrate talks he gave on Highland history. The following description is taken from Washington Wilson's own lecture notes.

After clearing the base of Marsgow, Blaven rises like a huge wall without a break or space. From the track (for road it cannot be called), a magnificent view of this very striking mountain can be had just before beginning to ascend Drumhain, from which the weird-looking peaks of the entire Coolin range appear to pass through all fantastic forms, while clouds rest on the black crevices on their sides. Over these mountains the eagle may be seen hovering, and from them ravens fly all the way to Rum to work havoc among the sheep. The descent from Drumhain to the shore of Loch Coruisk must be made very carefully, as the slope is steep, and a false step might land one at the bottom sooner than in the circumstances would be convenient.

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Blaven

INVERNESS: Strath

1890s

Skye; Marsgow; Marsco; Bla Bheinn; Drumhain; Druim-nan-ramh; eagles; ravens; Coolin; Coolins; Cuillin; Cuillins; Rum; Rhum; lochs; mountains; Coruisk

Mark Butterworth - Priscus

Imaging the Past

This photograph was taken by Scottish photographer George Washington Wilson (1823-93) and was used to illustrate talks he gave on Highland history. The following description is taken from Washington Wilson's own lecture notes.<br /> <br /> After clearing the base of Marsgow, Blaven rises like a huge wall without a break or space. From the track (for road it cannot be called), a magnificent view of this very striking mountain can be had just before beginning to ascend Drumhain, from which the weird-looking peaks of the entire Coolin range appear to pass through all fantastic forms, while clouds rest on the black crevices on their sides. Over these mountains the eagle may be seen hovering, and from them ravens fly all the way to Rum to work havoc among the sheep. The descent from Drumhain to the shore of Loch Coruisk must be made very carefully, as the slope is steep, and a false step might land one at the bottom sooner than in the circumstances would be convenient.