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TITLE
Waterstein Point
EXTERNAL ID
PC_PRISCUS_WCS6382
PLACENAME
Waterstein Point
DISTRICT
Skye
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Duirinish
PERIOD
1890s
CREATOR
George Washington Wilson
SOURCE
Mark Butterworth - Priscus
ASSET ID
29615
KEYWORDS
Skye
headlands
land law
agitation
cliffs
hawks
ravens
sea eagles
Dunvegan
Glendale
crofts
crofting
tilling
lochs
castles
Macleod
Waterstein Point

This photograph was taken by Scottish photographer George Washington Wilson (1823-93) and was used to illustrate talks he gave on Highland history. The following description is taken from Washington Wilson's own lecture notes.

Continuing in a north-westerly direction you come to Waterstein Point, a rugged headland rising to a great height, and famous as being the debatable ground where more recent land law agitation commenced. Among these rugged and inaccessible cliffs hawks, ravens, and sea eagles, defy the boldest adventurer and rear their young in perfect security. After leaving the rugged coast line and joining the road that leads to Dunvegan, we pass through a very extensive crofting district. This is the famous "Glendale," where, during the spring months, you may study with interest the very antiquated method of tilling the ground in the islands. Even on the mainland the same custom prevails when the crofts are small and the people poor, but it is universal all over the Western Isles.

Continuing our journey, Loch Dunvegan soon comes into view. At its head stands the very ancient Castle of Dunvegan, and for many a mile round everything reminds you that the country is Macleods'

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Waterstein Point

INVERNESS: Duirinish

1890s

Skye; headlands; land law; agitation; cliffs; hawks; ravens; sea eagles; Dunvegan; Glendale; crofts; crofting; tilling; lochs; castles; Macleod

Mark Butterworth - Priscus

Imaging the Past

This photograph was taken by Scottish photographer George Washington Wilson (1823-93) and was used to illustrate talks he gave on Highland history. The following description is taken from Washington Wilson's own lecture notes.<br /> <br /> Continuing in a north-westerly direction you come to Waterstein Point, a rugged headland rising to a great height, and famous as being the debatable ground where more recent land law agitation commenced. Among these rugged and inaccessible cliffs hawks, ravens, and sea eagles, defy the boldest adventurer and rear their young in perfect security. After leaving the rugged coast line and joining the road that leads to Dunvegan, we pass through a very extensive crofting district. This is the famous "Glendale," where, during the spring months, you may study with interest the very antiquated method of tilling the ground in the islands. Even on the mainland the same custom prevails when the crofts are small and the people poor, but it is universal all over the Western Isles.<br /> <br /> Continuing our journey, Loch Dunvegan soon comes into view. At its head stands the very ancient Castle of Dunvegan, and for many a mile round everything reminds you that the country is Macleods'