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TITLE
Quiraing, Skye
EXTERNAL ID
PC_PRISCUS_WCS6385
PLACENAME
The Quiraing
DISTRICT
Skye
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Kilmuir
PERIOD
1890s
CREATOR
George Washington Wilson
SOURCE
Mark Butterworth - Priscus
ASSET ID
29620
KEYWORDS
Skye
Uig
Needle
pinnacles
crags
Coolin
Coolins, Cuillin
Cuillins
lochs
Staffin
Rona
Raasay
Scour More
basalt
cliffs
Quiraing, Skye

This photograph was taken by Scottish photographer George Washington Wilson (1823-93) and was used to illustrate talks he gave on Highland history. The following description is taken from Washington Wilson's own lecture notes.

The special point of interest near Uig is the Quiraing, distant six miles over a very rough road, the last mile being a steep mountain path. At the entrance to the Quiraing is the "Needle," a pinnacle 120 feet high, past which the path runs up to the grassy plateau, called the Quiraing, the origin of which name is unknown. This grassy space, large enough to parade a regiment, is on the table-top surface of a rock having around it a confusion of pinnacles, spires, and fantastic crags. These assume grotesque resemblance to shattered towns, and when partly hidden by mist and rain suggest a chaos of weird and colossal masonry. The Quiraing, like the Coolins defies description; nothing yet written conveys a worthy description of the features of either. Through breaks in the cliffs, magnificent glimpses of the scenery of Loch Staffin - a bay immediately beneath the Quiraing are caught. The Isles of Rona and Raasay, besides an extensive stretch of the mainland are seen if the day is fine. The Scour More, on the slope of which the crags of the Quiraing lie scattered, rises 1774 feet above the sea, and all along its eastern face basalt cliffs are strewn. From the sea these shattered cliffs appear like the wreck of a great city, and present the most wonderful scenic effects.

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Quiraing, Skye

INVERNESS: Kilmuir

1890s

Skye; Uig; Needle; pinnacles; crags; Coolin; Coolins, Cuillin; Cuillins; lochs; Staffin; Rona; Raasay; Scour More; basalt; cliffs

Mark Butterworth - Priscus

Imaging the Past

This photograph was taken by Scottish photographer George Washington Wilson (1823-93) and was used to illustrate talks he gave on Highland history. The following description is taken from Washington Wilson's own lecture notes.<br /> <br /> The special point of interest near Uig is the Quiraing, distant six miles over a very rough road, the last mile being a steep mountain path. At the entrance to the Quiraing is the "Needle," a pinnacle 120 feet high, past which the path runs up to the grassy plateau, called the Quiraing, the origin of which name is unknown. This grassy space, large enough to parade a regiment, is on the table-top surface of a rock having around it a confusion of pinnacles, spires, and fantastic crags. These assume grotesque resemblance to shattered towns, and when partly hidden by mist and rain suggest a chaos of weird and colossal masonry. The Quiraing, like the Coolins defies description; nothing yet written conveys a worthy description of the features of either. Through breaks in the cliffs, magnificent glimpses of the scenery of Loch Staffin - a bay immediately beneath the Quiraing are caught. The Isles of Rona and Raasay, besides an extensive stretch of the mainland are seen if the day is fine. The Scour More, on the slope of which the crags of the Quiraing lie scattered, rises 1774 feet above the sea, and all along its eastern face basalt cliffs are strewn. From the sea these shattered cliffs appear like the wreck of a great city, and present the most wonderful scenic effects.