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TITLE
Dune of Carloway
EXTERNAL ID
PC_PRISCUS_WCS6389
PLACENAME
Carloway
DISTRICT
Lewis
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Uig
PERIOD
1890s
CREATOR
George Washington Wilson
SOURCE
Mark Butterworth - Priscus
ASSET ID
29623
KEYWORDS
dun
Picts
crofters
houses
dwellings
Hebrides
thatch
heather
Dune of Carloway

This photograph was taken by Scottish photographer George Washington Wilson (1823-93) and was used to illustrate talks he gave on Highland history. The following description is taken from Washington Wilson's own lecture notes.

The "Dune" of Carloway is one of the few interesting subjects in Lewis, and is similar to remains throughout the country associated with the Picts.

The crofter's house in the foreground shows an average dwelling in point of architecture, for here, as throughout the Hebrides, their houses were made of stone built without lime, and of very thick walls. The roof of bracken thatch rests on the top of the walls, leaving a foot or more of the wall-head uncovered. Were this not done, the gales of wind would get under the eaves and lift the roof off. Many heather ropes hold down the thatch, their ends being made fast to stones a foot or more square, which lie along on top of the walls.

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Dune of Carloway

ROSS: Uig

1890s

dun; Picts; crofters; houses; dwellings; Hebrides; thatch; heather

Mark Butterworth - Priscus

Imaging the Past

This photograph was taken by Scottish photographer George Washington Wilson (1823-93) and was used to illustrate talks he gave on Highland history. The following description is taken from Washington Wilson's own lecture notes.<br /> <br /> The "Dune" of Carloway is one of the few interesting subjects in Lewis, and is similar to remains throughout the country associated with the Picts.<br /> <br /> The crofter's house in the foreground shows an average dwelling in point of architecture, for here, as throughout the Hebrides, their houses were made of stone built without lime, and of very thick walls. The roof of bracken thatch rests on the top of the walls, leaving a foot or more of the wall-head uncovered. Were this not done, the gales of wind would get under the eaves and lift the roof off. Many heather ropes hold down the thatch, their ends being made fast to stones a foot or more square, which lie along on top of the walls.