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TITLE
Prince Charlie's Landing, South Uist
EXTERNAL ID
PC_PRISCUS_WCS6402
PLACENAME
Eriskay
DISTRICT
South Uist
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: South Uist
PERIOD
1890s
CREATOR
George Washington Wilson
SOURCE
Mark Butterworth - Priscus
ASSET ID
29635
KEYWORDS
islands
Prince Charles Edward Stuart
Eriskay
frigates
Doutelle
battles
Culloden
Long Island
South Uist
Ranald
St. Kilda
Macdonald
Macleod
Ben More
Prince Charlie's Landing, South Uist

This photograph was taken by Scottish photographer George Washington Wilson (1823-93) and was used to illustrate talks he gave on Highland history. The following description is taken from Washington Wilson's own lecture notes.

This Island more than any others is associated with the forlorn days of "Bonnie Prince Charlie." To the south, and separated by the sound of half a mile, lies the small island of Eriskay, where he landed for a very short time from the frigate "Doutelle," on his way to Scotland claiming its crown, which he conceived to be his right. Within a year he is back again with blasted hopes. After the battle of Culloden, having managed to make his way to the West Coast in safety, he embarked for the Long Island. Contrary winds, storms, and disappointments of several sorts, attended with hardships to which he could be little accustomed, drove him from place to place in that Island and its vicinity, till he gained South Uist, where he was received by Clan Ranald, who remained faithful to him, in his distresses. But for the unswerving fidelity of a faithful few, his safety was impossible, as search parties after having gone as far as St. Kilda looking for him, now landed on South Uist, and augmented the clans Macdonald and Macleod, who though but a short time before stood aloof, were now fairly against the unfortunate Prince. With two thousand men searching with eagerness the interior of the Island, and its shores surrounded with small vessels of war, armed boats, and the like, escape seemed impossible; and it is not to be wondered at that he should resort to the wild slope of Ben More for shelter, and hide himself in its dark, rocky recesses.

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Prince Charlie's Landing, South Uist

INVERNESS: South Uist

1890s

islands; Prince Charles Edward Stuart; Eriskay; frigates; Doutelle; battles; Culloden; Long Island; South Uist; Ranald; St. Kilda; Macdonald; Macleod; Ben More

Mark Butterworth - Priscus

Imaging the Past

This photograph was taken by Scottish photographer George Washington Wilson (1823-93) and was used to illustrate talks he gave on Highland history. The following description is taken from Washington Wilson's own lecture notes.<br /> <br /> This Island more than any others is associated with the forlorn days of "Bonnie Prince Charlie." To the south, and separated by the sound of half a mile, lies the small island of Eriskay, where he landed for a very short time from the frigate "Doutelle," on his way to Scotland claiming its crown, which he conceived to be his right. Within a year he is back again with blasted hopes. After the battle of Culloden, having managed to make his way to the West Coast in safety, he embarked for the Long Island. Contrary winds, storms, and disappointments of several sorts, attended with hardships to which he could be little accustomed, drove him from place to place in that Island and its vicinity, till he gained South Uist, where he was received by Clan Ranald, who remained faithful to him, in his distresses. But for the unswerving fidelity of a faithful few, his safety was impossible, as search parties after having gone as far as St. Kilda looking for him, now landed on South Uist, and augmented the clans Macdonald and Macleod, who though but a short time before stood aloof, were now fairly against the unfortunate Prince. With two thousand men searching with eagerness the interior of the Island, and its shores surrounded with small vessels of war, armed boats, and the like, escape seemed impossible; and it is not to be wondered at that he should resort to the wild slope of Ben More for shelter, and hide himself in its dark, rocky recesses.