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TITLE
St. Kilda and Stack Lee
EXTERNAL ID
PC_PRISCUS_WCS6410
PLACENAME
St Kilda
DISTRICT
Harris
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Harris
PERIOD
1890s
CREATOR
George Washington Wilson
SOURCE
Mark Butterworth - Priscus
ASSET ID
29640
KEYWORDS
islands
stacks
Lewis
Lochmaddy
North Uist
North Atlantic
beaches
St. Kilda and Stack Lee

This photograph was taken by Scottish photographer George Washington Wilson (1823-93) and was used to illustrate talks he gave on Highland history. The following description is taken from Washington Wilson's own lecture notes.

In a N.N Westerly direction lies the Island of St. Kilda, the most remote and probably inaccessible of the British Isles. It is sixty miles west from the mainland of Lewis, and one hundred and forty miles from the nearest point of the mainland of Scotland. Excursions are sometimes made in the summer time by steamers that regularly run to Loch Maddy and North Uist, but they are rare and uncertain. St Kilda, so isolated from the outer world, is situated in the lonely expanse of the North Atlantic, and though not sufficiently elevated to form a picturesque object in mid-ocean, there is something in the very name of St. Kilda that excites expectation.

The Island is about three miles long and at the broadest part nearly two. On the southeast side there is a bay about half a mile in breadth and depth, the land descending to it by a steep declivity and terminating at one point in a stony and sandy beach, and at another in those low shelving rocks which form the landing place near to which the town is situated.

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St. Kilda and Stack Lee

INVERNESS: Harris

1890s

islands; stacks; Lewis; Lochmaddy; North Uist; North Atlantic; beaches

Mark Butterworth - Priscus

Imaging the Past

This photograph was taken by Scottish photographer George Washington Wilson (1823-93) and was used to illustrate talks he gave on Highland history. The following description is taken from Washington Wilson's own lecture notes.<br /> <br /> In a N.N Westerly direction lies the Island of St. Kilda, the most remote and probably inaccessible of the British Isles. It is sixty miles west from the mainland of Lewis, and one hundred and forty miles from the nearest point of the mainland of Scotland. Excursions are sometimes made in the summer time by steamers that regularly run to Loch Maddy and North Uist, but they are rare and uncertain. St Kilda, so isolated from the outer world, is situated in the lonely expanse of the North Atlantic, and though not sufficiently elevated to form a picturesque object in mid-ocean, there is something in the very name of St. Kilda that excites expectation.<br /> <br /> The Island is about three miles long and at the broadest part nearly two. On the southeast side there is a bay about half a mile in breadth and depth, the land descending to it by a steep declivity and terminating at one point in a stony and sandy beach, and at another in those low shelving rocks which form the landing place near to which the town is situated.