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TITLE
Town and Bay, St. Kilda
EXTERNAL ID
PC_PRISCUS_WCS6411
PLACENAME
St Kilda
DISTRICT
Harris
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Harris
PERIOD
1890s
CREATOR
George Washington Wilson
SOURCE
Mark Butterworth - Priscus
ASSET ID
29641
KEYWORDS
St. Kilda
Western Isles
islands
potatoes
oats
cliffs
seabirds
fulmars
hair ropes
sheep
Boreray
Town and Bay, St. Kilda

This photograph was taken by Scottish photographer George Washington Wilson (1823-93) and was used to illustrate talks he gave on Highland history. The following description is taken from Washington Wilson's own lecture notes.

The language here is the same as throughout the Western Isles, and in many respects the habits of the natives are like their nearest neighbours, but as vegetation on the Island is very meagre they find their subsistence in a manner quite different from them. Instead of using the crooked spade, and in return receiving a miserable crop of potatoes and oats, you will find through the aid of hair rope combined with unparalleled agility in scaling the precipitous cliffs, thousands of Fulmar are secured and salted down for the season's use. Then they have sheep in abundance pasturing on Boreray

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Town and Bay, St. Kilda

INVERNESS: Harris

1890s

St. Kilda; Western Isles; islands; potatoes; oats; cliffs; seabirds; fulmars; hair ropes; sheep; Boreray

Mark Butterworth - Priscus

Imaging the Past

This photograph was taken by Scottish photographer George Washington Wilson (1823-93) and was used to illustrate talks he gave on Highland history. The following description is taken from Washington Wilson's own lecture notes.<br /> <br /> The language here is the same as throughout the Western Isles, and in many respects the habits of the natives are like their nearest neighbours, but as vegetation on the Island is very meagre they find their subsistence in a manner quite different from them. Instead of using the crooked spade, and in return receiving a miserable crop of potatoes and oats, you will find through the aid of hair rope combined with unparalleled agility in scaling the precipitous cliffs, thousands of Fulmar are secured and salted down for the season's use. Then they have sheep in abundance pasturing on Boreray