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TITLE
Boreray, St. Kilda
EXTERNAL ID
PC_PRISCUS_WCS6412
PLACENAME
Boreray
DISTRICT
Harris
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Harris
PERIOD
1890s
CREATOR
George Washington Wilson
SOURCE
Mark Butterworth - Priscus
ASSET ID
29642
KEYWORDS
St. Kilda
Macleod
islands
rents
seabirds
fulmars
feathers
oil
wool
superstitions
tourists
flannel
Boreray, St. Kilda

This photograph was taken by Scottish photographer George Washington Wilson (1823-93) and was used to illustrate talks he gave on Highland history. The following description is taken from Washington Wilson's own lecture notes.

Boreray, a small Island four miles distance from St. Kilda, and completely mantled in green with the exception of a margin around its base.

St. Kilda belongs to Macleod of Macleod, whose agent visits it twice a year to collect rents, and supply the people with stores in return for feathers and oil from the Fulmar, which with the wool they, grow constitutes the only source of wealth the St. Kildeans possess. Being so isolated it is not to be wondered at if in many things they are behind the age, and the occasional tourist who would treat them as they would a South Sea Islander gets a poor reception, but one who lives amongst them for a time will find them hospitable and trustworthy, and like all Western Highlanders, they are very superstitious. They also wear an extraordinary load of flannel clothing, and declare that the arrival of a stranger gives them the cold.

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Boreray, St. Kilda

INVERNESS: Harris

1890s

St. Kilda; Macleod; islands; rents; seabirds; fulmars; feathers; oil; wool; superstitions; tourists; flannel

Mark Butterworth - Priscus

Imaging the Past

This photograph was taken by Scottish photographer George Washington Wilson (1823-93) and was used to illustrate talks he gave on Highland history. The following description is taken from Washington Wilson's own lecture notes.<br /> <br /> Boreray, a small Island four miles distance from St. Kilda, and completely mantled in green with the exception of a margin around its base.<br /> <br /> St. Kilda belongs to Macleod of Macleod, whose agent visits it twice a year to collect rents, and supply the people with stores in return for feathers and oil from the Fulmar, which with the wool they, grow constitutes the only source of wealth the St. Kildeans possess. Being so isolated it is not to be wondered at if in many things they are behind the age, and the occasional tourist who would treat them as they would a South Sea Islander gets a poor reception, but one who lives amongst them for a time will find them hospitable and trustworthy, and like all Western Highlanders, they are very superstitious. They also wear an extraordinary load of flannel clothing, and declare that the arrival of a stranger gives them the cold.