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TITLE
Hunting Fulmar, St. Kilda
EXTERNAL ID
PC_PRISCUS_WCS6414
PLACENAME
St Kilda
DISTRICT
Harris
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Harris
PERIOD
1890s
CREATOR
George Washington Wilson
SOURCE
Mark Butterworth - Priscus
ASSET ID
29644
KEYWORDS
islands
seabirds
fulmars
oil
gannets
bladders
Hunting Fulmar, St. Kilda

This photograph was taken by Scottish photographer George Washington Wilson (1823-93) and was used to illustrate talks he gave on Highland history. The following description is taken from Washington Wilson's own lecture notes.

The great event of the season is the securing of the Fulmar, a bird as far as the British Isles are concerned is associated with St. Kilda only, and of the myriads of birds that live and rear their young on and around the Island they are the most valuable to the natives. They are in the habit of securing them just before the young are able to fly; and in doing this considerable dexterity is necessary, as if the birds are surprised and not secured and strangled by the first clutch of the hand they immediately vomit on the intruder what a St. Kildean prizes highly, namely, its oil. This they take from the bird at a more convenient time, and secure in bladders made of the intestines taken from the Gannet which abounds on their Island.

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Hunting Fulmar, St. Kilda

INVERNESS: Harris

1890s

islands; seabirds; fulmars; oil; gannets; bladders

Mark Butterworth - Priscus

Imaging the Past

This photograph was taken by Scottish photographer George Washington Wilson (1823-93) and was used to illustrate talks he gave on Highland history. The following description is taken from Washington Wilson's own lecture notes.<br /> <br /> The great event of the season is the securing of the Fulmar, a bird as far as the British Isles are concerned is associated with St. Kilda only, and of the myriads of birds that live and rear their young on and around the Island they are the most valuable to the natives. They are in the habit of securing them just before the young are able to fly; and in doing this considerable dexterity is necessary, as if the birds are surprised and not secured and strangled by the first clutch of the hand they immediately vomit on the intruder what a St. Kildean prizes highly, namely, its oil. This they take from the bird at a more convenient time, and secure in bladders made of the intestines taken from the Gannet which abounds on their Island.