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TITLE
Sheep Shearing
EXTERNAL ID
PC_RAMSAY_043
PLACENAME
Auchtertyre
DISTRICT
South West Ross
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
ROSS: Lochalsh
PERIOD
1930s
CREATOR
William J Ramsay
SOURCE
William J Ramsay
ASSET ID
29738
KEYWORDS
shearing
buisting
sheep
Sheep Shearing

This early summer photograph, taken at Auchtertyre, shows a gathering at the fank for the annual sheep shearing. To-day, with the use of electric clippers, shearing is a hard job, but before this, using hand clippers, it was surely exhausting. The sheep are placed in front of the shearer, sometimes on a raised bench (or hillock), with the shearer choosing to either stand or sit. Once sheared, the sheep are marked with the owners' identifying mark. In this photograph the young girl is holding an iron, called a buisting iron in some north west communities. It would be dipped in heated tar or special paint and marked on the sheeps flank. The following names accompany this photo; from left, Roddie MacLay, Neil Gordon, his father Tommy Gordon, Mary Ann MacLay, Mrs MacDonald, and Donnie MacLay.

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Sheep Shearing

ROSS: Lochalsh

1930s

shearing; buisting; sheep

William J Ramsay

William J Ramsay Archive

This early summer photograph, taken at Auchtertyre, shows a gathering at the fank for the annual sheep shearing. To-day, with the use of electric clippers, shearing is a hard job, but before this, using hand clippers, it was surely exhausting. The sheep are placed in front of the shearer, sometimes on a raised bench (or hillock), with the shearer choosing to either stand or sit. Once sheared, the sheep are marked with the owners' identifying mark. In this photograph the young girl is holding an iron, called a buisting iron in some north west communities. It would be dipped in heated tar or special paint and marked on the sheeps flank. The following names accompany this photo; from left, Roddie MacLay, Neil Gordon, his father Tommy Gordon, Mary Ann MacLay, Mrs MacDonald, and Donnie MacLay.