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TITLE
George Taylor Bruce, Rector 1888 to 1894
EXTERNAL ID
PC_ROYALACADEMY_003
PLACENAME
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona
PERIOD
1890s
SOURCE
Inverness Royal Academy
ASSET ID
29924
KEYWORDS
schools
rectors
teachers
jobs
people
George Taylor Bruce, Rector 1888 to 1894

George Bruce was the thirteenth Rector of Inverness Royal Academy. The school was founded in 1792, replacing a former grammar school in the town. The premises were then in Academy Street, originally called New Street.

A new Board of Management of the Academy had taken office in 1887, following the introduction by the Government of a new Inverness Educational Endowments Scheme. This scheme allowed the Directors to dismiss all the existing staff and appoint a new Rector. Bruce's predecessor, William Eadie, wanted to retire, and this was eventually arranged by giving him a pension.

There were seventy-five applications for the job at a salary of £300 plus a capitation grant. George Bruce was appointed. He had been born in Aberdeen in 1857 and educated at the New and Old Grammar Schools in the city. He graduated Master of Arts from Aberdeen University in April 1880. After various teaching jobs he taught classics and senior English at Robert Gordon's College in Aberdeen. Under the terms of his appointment to the Academy, Bruce was able to appoint all his own staff. One of his appointments was Pierre Delavault, who is still well known for his illustrations of old Inverness, originally published by the Inverness Courier.

When the school was approaching its centenary in 1892, Bruce was the person who took the most interest in marking the event. He started a 'master's magazine', The Academical, which ran until he was forced to resign. He also created interest in a coat of arms for the school, using an Aberdeen architect to produce a design. This was later modified and matriculated in 1933 by the Lord Lyon King of Arms, giving the present version of the coat of arms and the school badge.

The Directors, following various inspection reports, realised that the existing building in Academy Street (link to photo of Academy Street building already on website) was unsuitable for the type of education then required. They started work on plans for a new building, which was opened in 1895 in the Crown district of the town. However, the Directors were not convinced that Bruce was the right person to take the school forward into the new building and, despite vigourous representations from some parents, he was forced to resign, although he was apparently conscientious and hardworking. The first known photograph of the school staff dates from probably just before his resignation.

Following his departure from the Academy, he ran his own school from a house in Culduthel Road in the town. It was called the New Glenmoriston School. This lasted for about ten years, after which Bruce farmed in Canada. He died in 1947.

(thanks to Robert Preece for this information)

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George Taylor Bruce, Rector 1888 to 1894

INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona

1890s

schools; rectors; teachers; jobs; people

Inverness Royal Academy

Inverness Royal Academy (photographs)

George Bruce was the thirteenth Rector of Inverness Royal Academy. The school was founded in 1792, replacing a former grammar school in the town. The premises were then in Academy Street, originally called New Street.<br /> <br /> A new Board of Management of the Academy had taken office in 1887, following the introduction by the Government of a new Inverness Educational Endowments Scheme. This scheme allowed the Directors to dismiss all the existing staff and appoint a new Rector. Bruce's predecessor, William Eadie, wanted to retire, and this was eventually arranged by giving him a pension.<br /> <br /> There were seventy-five applications for the job at a salary of £300 plus a capitation grant. George Bruce was appointed. He had been born in Aberdeen in 1857 and educated at the New and Old Grammar Schools in the city. He graduated Master of Arts from Aberdeen University in April 1880. After various teaching jobs he taught classics and senior English at Robert Gordon's College in Aberdeen. Under the terms of his appointment to the Academy, Bruce was able to appoint all his own staff. One of his appointments was Pierre Delavault, who is still well known for his illustrations of old Inverness, originally published by the Inverness Courier.<br /> <br /> When the school was approaching its centenary in 1892, Bruce was the person who took the most interest in marking the event. He started a 'master's magazine', The Academical, which ran until he was forced to resign. He also created interest in a coat of arms for the school, using an Aberdeen architect to produce a design. This was later modified and matriculated in 1933 by the Lord Lyon King of Arms, giving the present version of the coat of arms and the school badge.<br /> <br /> The Directors, following various inspection reports, realised that the existing building in Academy Street (link to photo of Academy Street building already on website) was unsuitable for the type of education then required. They started work on plans for a new building, which was opened in 1895 in the Crown district of the town. However, the Directors were not convinced that Bruce was the right person to take the school forward into the new building and, despite vigourous representations from some parents, he was forced to resign, although he was apparently conscientious and hardworking. The first known photograph of the school staff dates from probably just before his resignation.<br /> <br /> Following his departure from the Academy, he ran his own school from a house in Culduthel Road in the town. It was called the New Glenmoriston School. This lasted for about ten years, after which Bruce farmed in Canada. He died in 1947.<br /> <br /> (thanks to Robert Preece for this information)