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TITLE
Extract of Matriculation of the Arms of Inverness Royal Academy, 1933
EXTERNAL ID
PC_ROYALACADEMY_015
PLACENAME
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona
PERIOD
1930s
SOURCE
Inverness Royal Academy
ASSET ID
29936
KEYWORDS
schools
education
coats of arms
crests
shields
Extract of Matriculation of the Arms of Inverness Royal Academy, 1933

The School badge and coat of arms was the brainchild of Mr George Bruce, who was rector of Inverness Royal Academy when the school celebrated its centenary. However, it was not until 15 May 1933 that the badge was formally recognised with the granting of an extract of matriculation by the Lord Lyon, King of Arms. The motto Labore et virtue means By Hard Work and Excellence.

Inverness Royal Academy was founded in 1792. It replaced a former grammar school in the town, with links going back to the Inverness Friary 'Sang Schuile' (song school). The original premises were in New Street, soon renamed Academy Street. The school obtained a Royal Charter from King George III in 1793, hence the use of the word 'Royal' in its title. The charter is currently on display in the Academy.

When the school was approaching its centenary in 1892, George Bruce (Rector, 1884-1894) was the person who took the most interest in marking the event. He started a 'master's magazine', The Academical, which ran until he was forced to resign. He also created interest in a coat of arms for the school. He sketched the original design, noting the significance of the Mackintosh family in the foundation and running of the school.

A William Mackintosh was the Provost of Inverness in the year the school was founded, and in the early 1800s Captain William Mackintosh of Farr bequeathed a significant sum of money so that members of his family could be educated at the Royal Academy. The money is now part of the endowments of the Academy and is known as the Mackintosh Farr Fund.

An Aberdeen architect, Mr G. H. Gall, redrew the design for the coat of arms, and the final version was agreed in June 1892. The saltire with the open book represents a Scottish seat of learning. The camel's head and the elephant's head form part of the coat of arms of Inverness when it was a burgh. In the base of the shield is a 'cat salient', representing the Mackintosh family. The crown in the upper quarter represents the Royal connection through the charter. Although originally below the shield, but now above it, is the Academy motto, Labore et Virtute, which can be most directly translated as 'Work and Virtue'. Below the motto is a 'torch of learning'.

In November 1932, the Lord Lyon King of Arms wrote to the Academy pointing out the Arms had not been matriculated and that as a result the school could be prosecuted and fined each and every time that the Arms were used. However if action was taken immediately the arms could be registered officially and used without further legal action. This was done at a cost of £19 in March 1933, and the extract of the arms was registered in May 1933. The official version as shown here did not differ in any major detail from the version that had evolved in the early part of the twentieth century.

(thanks to Robert Preece for this information)

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Extract of Matriculation of the Arms of Inverness Royal Academy, 1933

INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona

1930s

schools; education; coats of arms; crests; shields

Inverness Royal Academy

Inverness Royal Academy (photographs)

The School badge and coat of arms was the brainchild of Mr George Bruce, who was rector of Inverness Royal Academy when the school celebrated its centenary. However, it was not until 15 May 1933 that the badge was formally recognised with the granting of an extract of matriculation by the Lord Lyon, King of Arms. The motto Labore et virtue means By Hard Work and Excellence.<br /> <br /> Inverness Royal Academy was founded in 1792. It replaced a former grammar school in the town, with links going back to the Inverness Friary 'Sang Schuile' (song school). The original premises were in New Street, soon renamed Academy Street. The school obtained a Royal Charter from King George III in 1793, hence the use of the word 'Royal' in its title. The charter is currently on display in the Academy.<br /> <br /> When the school was approaching its centenary in 1892, George Bruce (Rector, 1884-1894) was the person who took the most interest in marking the event. He started a 'master's magazine', The Academical, which ran until he was forced to resign. He also created interest in a coat of arms for the school. He sketched the original design, noting the significance of the Mackintosh family in the foundation and running of the school.<br /> <br /> A William Mackintosh was the Provost of Inverness in the year the school was founded, and in the early 1800s Captain William Mackintosh of Farr bequeathed a significant sum of money so that members of his family could be educated at the Royal Academy. The money is now part of the endowments of the Academy and is known as the Mackintosh Farr Fund.<br /> <br /> An Aberdeen architect, Mr G. H. Gall, redrew the design for the coat of arms, and the final version was agreed in June 1892. The saltire with the open book represents a Scottish seat of learning. The camel's head and the elephant's head form part of the coat of arms of Inverness when it was a burgh. In the base of the shield is a 'cat salient', representing the Mackintosh family. The crown in the upper quarter represents the Royal connection through the charter. Although originally below the shield, but now above it, is the Academy motto, Labore et Virtute, which can be most directly translated as 'Work and Virtue'. Below the motto is a 'torch of learning'.<br /> <br /> In November 1932, the Lord Lyon King of Arms wrote to the Academy pointing out the Arms had not been matriculated and that as a result the school could be prosecuted and fined each and every time that the Arms were used. However if action was taken immediately the arms could be registered officially and used without further legal action. This was done at a cost of £19 in March 1933, and the extract of the arms was registered in May 1933. The official version as shown here did not differ in any major detail from the version that had evolved in the early part of the twentieth century.<br /> <br /> (thanks to Robert Preece for this information)