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TITLE
The Chapel, Eden Court, Inverness
EXTERNAL ID
PC_STAND_CATH_002
PLACENAME
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona
SOURCE
Scottish Episcopal Church, Diocese of Moray, Ross and Caithness
ASSET ID
29999
KEYWORDS
chapels
churches
The Chapel, Eden Court, Inverness

Eden Court was built in the late 1870s as a palace for the Bishop of Moray, Ross and Caithness for the Scottish Episcopal Church, Bishop Robert Eden. Eden had driven the redevelopment of the Diocese, after his appointment as Bishop of Moray and Ross (as it then was) in 1851. He was originally based in Elgin, living in Duffus House, but after a couple of years he moved to Inverness, where he lived in Hedgefield House in Culduthel Road.

In 1866 he had been able to get the foundation stone of his new Cathedral laid on a site beside the River Ness. The building was designed by local architect Alexander Ross. Work advanced rapidly and by 1869 services were able to be held in the building, although consecration (which could not take place until the debt was paid off) did not happen until 1874.

The Episcopal Church felt that they owed Bishop Eden a great debt for what he had achieved, and it was decided that building a palace was the best answer. Bishop Eden purchased the land himself, close to the Cathedral, from Sir Alexander Matheson, and the building was erected in 1877/1878.

A private chapel opened off the staircase, and was built entirely at Bishop Eden's expense at a cost of £1000. It is now available for meetings and events, having been the Theatre green room from 1976. The original library next door has disappeared and is now occupied by a lift shaft and corridor.

Eden Court was occupied by four Bishops: Bishop Eden (until his death in 1886); Bishop James Kelly (1886-1904); Bishop Arthur Maclean (1904-1935); and Bishop Piers Holt Wilson (1943-1947).

After World War II upkeep of the building became too great for the Church to sustain. In the final years, the Bishop could only afford to heat one room, and there are stories of ice forming overnight in washbowls left in the bedrooms. The building was sold in 1947 for use as a residential pre-training centre for nurses, but was sold in 1966 with the opening of a new centre at Raigmore.

The building then lay empty for almost a decade. In 1976, the Eden Court building became the offices and dressing rooms for the theatre complex, but with the recent redevelopment, the Palace has now become available for public use.

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The Chapel, Eden Court, Inverness

INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona

chapels; churches

Scottish Episcopal Church, Diocese of Moray, Ross and Caithness

St Andrew's Cathedral, Inverness

Eden Court was built in the late 1870s as a palace for the Bishop of Moray, Ross and Caithness for the Scottish Episcopal Church, Bishop Robert Eden. Eden had driven the redevelopment of the Diocese, after his appointment as Bishop of Moray and Ross (as it then was) in 1851. He was originally based in Elgin, living in Duffus House, but after a couple of years he moved to Inverness, where he lived in Hedgefield House in Culduthel Road.<br /> <br /> In 1866 he had been able to get the foundation stone of his new Cathedral laid on a site beside the River Ness. The building was designed by local architect Alexander Ross. Work advanced rapidly and by 1869 services were able to be held in the building, although consecration (which could not take place until the debt was paid off) did not happen until 1874.<br /> <br /> The Episcopal Church felt that they owed Bishop Eden a great debt for what he had achieved, and it was decided that building a palace was the best answer. Bishop Eden purchased the land himself, close to the Cathedral, from Sir Alexander Matheson, and the building was erected in 1877/1878.<br /> <br /> A private chapel opened off the staircase, and was built entirely at Bishop Eden's expense at a cost of £1000. It is now available for meetings and events, having been the Theatre green room from 1976. The original library next door has disappeared and is now occupied by a lift shaft and corridor.<br /> <br /> Eden Court was occupied by four Bishops: Bishop Eden (until his death in 1886); Bishop James Kelly (1886-1904); Bishop Arthur Maclean (1904-1935); and Bishop Piers Holt Wilson (1943-1947).<br /> <br /> After World War II upkeep of the building became too great for the Church to sustain. In the final years, the Bishop could only afford to heat one room, and there are stories of ice forming overnight in washbowls left in the bedrooms. The building was sold in 1947 for use as a residential pre-training centre for nurses, but was sold in 1966 with the opening of a new centre at Raigmore.<br /> <br /> The building then lay empty for almost a decade. In 1976, the Eden Court building became the offices and dressing rooms for the theatre complex, but with the recent redevelopment, the Palace has now become available for public use.