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TITLE
Cathedral Close, Inverness: conjectural scheme
EXTERNAL ID
PC_STAND_CATH_003
PLACENAME
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona
PERIOD
1860s
CREATOR
unknown
SOURCE
St Andrew's Cathedral, Inverness
ASSET ID
30000
KEYWORDS
cathedrals
town plans
urban planning
Cathedral Close, Inverness: conjectural scheme

Illustration of what the cathedral and Bishop Eden's residence would look like when completed.

Plans (which were never realised) included the building, along the lines of an English Cathedral city, of a Cathedral close, with houses for the clergy, a Bishop's Palace and related buildings, in the area south-west of the Cathedral. The only parts of this plan that were completed (to a different design) were the Bishop's Palace (the original section of the present-day Eden Court) and a boys' school, for the education of local children, founded elsewhere in the town in 1854. The school building, now used as a church hall, lies against the wall of the Northern Meeting Park. The boys' school was combined with the Bishop's Girls' School in 1874 in a building in King Street, now known as Bishop Eden's School. It is still run under the auspice of the Scottish Episcopal Church, although open to all children.

In 1851 Bishop Robert Eden was appointed as Bishop of the Diocese of Moray and Ross for the Scottish Episcopal Church (Caithness was added later). At first he was based in Elgin, but he soon realised that Inverness was far more central to his diocese than was Elgin, so in 1853 he moved to Inverness. He established a Mission Chapel in the Maggot area of the town, but had plans for a Cathedral, which came to fruition in 1866.

The site was purchased on undeveloped land south-west of the recently constructed suspension bridge over the River Ness, a short distance back from the river. The architect was a young local architect, Alexander Ross (who was an Episcopalian), but his initial design had to be cut back through limited funds.

The foundation stone was laid by the Archbishop of Canterbury, Dr Charles Longley, on 17th October 1866, the first official act in Scotland by a English Primate since the establishment of Presbyterianism in Scotland. Some locals objected to the involvement of the Inverness militia and the local volunteers in an event associated with a non-established church, and strongly-worded press campaign ensued.

The Cathedral was built at a cost of over £15000, a cost which excluded the stained glass, the organ, and many of the furnishings which were all donated. The first services in the new building took place in 1869, but the Cathedral was not consecrated until 1874, as a debt of nearly £7000 remained on the project at the time of opening. This was the first Cathedral to be built and consecrated in Britain since the Reformation.

The source of this illustration is not known.

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Cathedral Close, Inverness: conjectural scheme

INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona

1860s

cathedrals; town plans; urban planning

St Andrew's Cathedral, Inverness

Scottish Episcopal Church, Diocese of Moray, Ross and Caithness

Illustration of what the cathedral and Bishop Eden's residence would look like when completed.<br /> <br /> Plans (which were never realised) included the building, along the lines of an English Cathedral city, of a Cathedral close, with houses for the clergy, a Bishop's Palace and related buildings, in the area south-west of the Cathedral. The only parts of this plan that were completed (to a different design) were the Bishop's Palace (the original section of the present-day Eden Court) and a boys' school, for the education of local children, founded elsewhere in the town in 1854. The school building, now used as a church hall, lies against the wall of the Northern Meeting Park. The boys' school was combined with the Bishop's Girls' School in 1874 in a building in King Street, now known as Bishop Eden's School. It is still run under the auspice of the Scottish Episcopal Church, although open to all children.<br /> <br /> In 1851 Bishop Robert Eden was appointed as Bishop of the Diocese of Moray and Ross for the Scottish Episcopal Church (Caithness was added later). At first he was based in Elgin, but he soon realised that Inverness was far more central to his diocese than was Elgin, so in 1853 he moved to Inverness. He established a Mission Chapel in the Maggot area of the town, but had plans for a Cathedral, which came to fruition in 1866.<br /> <br /> The site was purchased on undeveloped land south-west of the recently constructed suspension bridge over the River Ness, a short distance back from the river. The architect was a young local architect, Alexander Ross (who was an Episcopalian), but his initial design had to be cut back through limited funds.<br /> <br /> The foundation stone was laid by the Archbishop of Canterbury, Dr Charles Longley, on 17th October 1866, the first official act in Scotland by a English Primate since the establishment of Presbyterianism in Scotland. Some locals objected to the involvement of the Inverness militia and the local volunteers in an event associated with a non-established church, and strongly-worded press campaign ensued.<br /> <br /> The Cathedral was built at a cost of over £15000, a cost which excluded the stained glass, the organ, and many of the furnishings which were all donated. The first services in the new building took place in 1869, but the Cathedral was not consecrated until 1874, as a debt of nearly £7000 remained on the project at the time of opening. This was the first Cathedral to be built and consecrated in Britain since the Reformation.<br /> <br /> The source of this illustration is not known.