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TITLE
The Font, St Andrew's Cathedral, Inverness
EXTERNAL ID
PC_STAND_CATH_016
PLACENAME
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona
SOURCE
St Andrew's Cathedral, Inverness
ASSET ID
30012
KEYWORDS
churches
cathedrals
church architecture
church interiors
cathedral architecture
cathedral interiors
The Font, St Andrew's Cathedral, Inverness

The font is one of the Cathedral's treasures. It was not installed at the time of the opening of the Cathedral but was in place by the time of the consecration in 1874. This photograph dates from the 1960s. At the end of that decade the painted artificial stonework on the walls was replaced by a uniform cream colour, which lightened the building. The railings shown here were replaced in 1969 by ones given by the staff and pupils of Bishop Eden's School.

The font is in the form of a scallop shell, held by a kneeling angel, carved in white marble. It is the work of the London-based sculptor, James F. Redfern (1838-76), based on the kneeling angel font by the Danish sculptor, Bertel Thorwaldsen (1770-1844), which was part of his designs for the reconstruction of the Church of Our Lady (Vor Frue Kirke) in Copenhagen.

This copy differs from the original in one important respect: the face is not that of Thorwaldsen's angel (which had flowing locks down past the shoulders and a chaplet-wreath around the head), but that of the wife of the donor, Colonel Learmonth of Dean (in Edinburgh).

In Scotland, similar fonts can be found in St Giles Cathedral in Edinburgh, St John the Evangelist in Dumfries and St Margaret's (Newlands) in Glasgow. Other fonts to the same design can be seen in a church in Akureyri in northern Iceland and in the Cathedral of St George in Georgetown, Guyana. The Icelandic copy is by an Italian sculptor, but the one in Guyana was sculpted by Andrew Davidson of Inverness (who did carve the pulpit in Inverness Cathedral). At least two other versions exist in the United States of America.

The foundation stone of St Andrew's Cathedral had been laid in 1866, and the first services in the new building took place in 1869, but the Cathedral was not consecrated until 1874, as a debt of nearly £7000 remained on the project at the time of opening. The Cathedral was built at a cost of over £15000, a cost which excluded the stained glass, the organ, and many of the furnishings, which were donated. This was the first Cathedral to be built and consecrated in Britain since the Reformation.

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The Font, St Andrew's Cathedral, Inverness

INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona

churches; cathedrals; church architecture; church interiors; cathedral architecture; cathedral interiors

St Andrew's Cathedral, Inverness

St Andrew's Cathedral, Inverness

The font is one of the Cathedral's treasures. It was not installed at the time of the opening of the Cathedral but was in place by the time of the consecration in 1874. This photograph dates from the 1960s. At the end of that decade the painted artificial stonework on the walls was replaced by a uniform cream colour, which lightened the building. The railings shown here were replaced in 1969 by ones given by the staff and pupils of Bishop Eden's School.<br /> <br /> The font is in the form of a scallop shell, held by a kneeling angel, carved in white marble. It is the work of the London-based sculptor, James F. Redfern (1838-76), based on the kneeling angel font by the Danish sculptor, Bertel Thorwaldsen (1770-1844), which was part of his designs for the reconstruction of the Church of Our Lady (Vor Frue Kirke) in Copenhagen.<br /> <br /> This copy differs from the original in one important respect: the face is not that of Thorwaldsen's angel (which had flowing locks down past the shoulders and a chaplet-wreath around the head), but that of the wife of the donor, Colonel Learmonth of Dean (in Edinburgh).<br /> <br /> In Scotland, similar fonts can be found in St Giles Cathedral in Edinburgh, St John the Evangelist in Dumfries and St Margaret's (Newlands) in Glasgow. Other fonts to the same design can be seen in a church in Akureyri in northern Iceland and in the Cathedral of St George in Georgetown, Guyana. The Icelandic copy is by an Italian sculptor, but the one in Guyana was sculpted by Andrew Davidson of Inverness (who did carve the pulpit in Inverness Cathedral). At least two other versions exist in the United States of America.<br /> <br /> The foundation stone of St Andrew's Cathedral had been laid in 1866, and the first services in the new building took place in 1869, but the Cathedral was not consecrated until 1874, as a debt of nearly £7000 remained on the project at the time of opening. The Cathedral was built at a cost of over £15000, a cost which excluded the stained glass, the organ, and many of the furnishings, which were donated. This was the first Cathedral to be built and consecrated in Britain since the Reformation.