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TITLE
The Nave and Chancel, St Andrew's Cathedral, Inverness
EXTERNAL ID
PC_STAND_CATH_017
PLACENAME
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona
PERIOD
1970s
SOURCE
St Andrew's Cathedral, Inverness
ASSET ID
30013
KEYWORDS
churches
cathedrals
church architecture
church interiors
cathedral architecture
cathedral interiors
The Nave and Chancel, St Andrew's Cathedral, Inverness

This view of the interior of the Cathedral dates from about 1970, and apart from the lighting shows little change today. The nave of four bays is 27 metres long and the chance is 18 metres. The plan is in the shape of a cross, although, due to the restrictions of the site, the church is not orientated with the altar at the east end, but at the south-west end of the building.

The pillars are each single blocks of Peterhead granite. The capitals (at the top of the pillars) are deeply carved, with foliage, flowers and birds. This was executed by local craftsmen, despite their lack of experience of such work. Above the capitals are carved faces. Three are of former Bishops and one shows Alexander Ross, the architect. Parts of the two side aisles can be seen on either side of the nave.

At the junction of the nave with the choir is the War Memorial screen and the hanging rood, which date from 1923, and are the work of Sir Robert Lorimer, best known as the architect of the Scottish National War Memorial in Edinburgh Castle. These two items represent the congregation's memorial to its members who fell during World War I. Their names are carved on the panels.

The foundation stone of St Andrew's Cathedral had been laid in 1866, and the first services in the new building took place in 1869, but the Cathedral was not consecrated until 1874, as a debt of nearly £7000 remained on the project at the time of opening. The Cathedral was built at a cost of over £15000, a cost which excluded the stained glass, the organ, and many of the furnishings, which were donated. This was the first Cathedral to be built and consecrated in Britain since the Reformation.

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The Nave and Chancel, St Andrew's Cathedral, Inverness

INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona

1970s

churches; cathedrals; church architecture; church interiors; cathedral architecture; cathedral interiors

St Andrew's Cathedral, Inverness

St Andrew's Cathedral, Inverness

This view of the interior of the Cathedral dates from about 1970, and apart from the lighting shows little change today. The nave of four bays is 27 metres long and the chance is 18 metres. The plan is in the shape of a cross, although, due to the restrictions of the site, the church is not orientated with the altar at the east end, but at the south-west end of the building. <br /> <br /> The pillars are each single blocks of Peterhead granite. The capitals (at the top of the pillars) are deeply carved, with foliage, flowers and birds. This was executed by local craftsmen, despite their lack of experience of such work. Above the capitals are carved faces. Three are of former Bishops and one shows Alexander Ross, the architect. Parts of the two side aisles can be seen on either side of the nave.<br /> <br /> At the junction of the nave with the choir is the War Memorial screen and the hanging rood, which date from 1923, and are the work of Sir Robert Lorimer, best known as the architect of the Scottish National War Memorial in Edinburgh Castle. These two items represent the congregation's memorial to its members who fell during World War I. Their names are carved on the panels.<br /> <br /> The foundation stone of St Andrew's Cathedral had been laid in 1866, and the first services in the new building took place in 1869, but the Cathedral was not consecrated until 1874, as a debt of nearly £7000 remained on the project at the time of opening. The Cathedral was built at a cost of over £15000, a cost which excluded the stained glass, the organ, and many of the furnishings, which were donated. This was the first Cathedral to be built and consecrated in Britain since the Reformation.