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TITLE
The Pulpit and Chancel, St Andrew's Cathedral, Inverness
EXTERNAL ID
PC_STAND_CATH_023
PLACENAME
Inverness
OLD COUNTY/PARISH
INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona
PERIOD
1890s
SOURCE
St Andrew's Cathedral, Inverness
ASSET ID
30019
KEYWORDS
churches
cathedrals
church architecture
church interiors
cathedral architecture
cathedral interiors
The Pulpit and Chancel, St Andrew's Cathedral, Inverness

This image shows the Choir and Sanctuary of the Cathedral from the front of the Nave.

The metal screen and gates at the front of the picture were later replaced by the present War Memorial screen, and the choir stalls were replaced with the present stalls in 1909, as a memorial to Bishop James Kelly. The curtains on either side of the altar were replaced in 1951 with wood panelling as a memorial to Bishop Arthur Maclean.

The Bishop's throne, on the right, still survives. It was carved locally, in solid oak, by Andrew Fraser. The coat of arms of the Diocese of Moray, Ross and Caithness is mounted on the back of the chair. This seat is the 'kathedra', the Greek word for the Bishop's throne, which makes this a Cathedral Church.

The altar, the gift of Bishop Eden, is of Caen stone and alabaster, with inlaid panels of the Agnus Dei (Lamb of God) and the Pelican. Above the altar the reredos is of Caen stone, and was carved by Thomas Earp. It shows in the centre the Crucifixion, flanked by panels showing Christ's agony in Gethsemane, and, on the other side, the Resurrection.

The pulpit on the left was donated by Frances Walker of Foyers, convenor of the original Building Committee of the Cathedral. It was carved by the local firm of D. & A. Davidson in Caen stone and green Irish marble, supported on columns of granite from Abriachan (beside Loch Ness). The carved panels represent St Andrew preaching from his cross; the Good Shepherd; and St John the Baptist preaching in the wilderness.

The organ seen here was the gift of Miss MacPherson-Grant of Aberlour. It was built by Hill & Son, London. The original instrument was rebuilt in 1928, but recently the cost of further rebuilding was so high that it had to be replaced by a modern digital organ.

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The Pulpit and Chancel, St Andrew's Cathedral, Inverness

INVERNESS: Inverness and Bona

1890s

churches; cathedrals; church architecture; church interiors; cathedral architecture; cathedral interiors

St Andrew's Cathedral, Inverness

St Andrew's Cathedral, Inverness

This image shows the Choir and Sanctuary of the Cathedral from the front of the Nave. <br /> <br /> The metal screen and gates at the front of the picture were later replaced by the present War Memorial screen, and the choir stalls were replaced with the present stalls in 1909, as a memorial to Bishop James Kelly. The curtains on either side of the altar were replaced in 1951 with wood panelling as a memorial to Bishop Arthur Maclean.<br /> <br /> The Bishop's throne, on the right, still survives. It was carved locally, in solid oak, by Andrew Fraser. The coat of arms of the Diocese of Moray, Ross and Caithness is mounted on the back of the chair. This seat is the 'kathedra', the Greek word for the Bishop's throne, which makes this a Cathedral Church.<br /> <br /> The altar, the gift of Bishop Eden, is of Caen stone and alabaster, with inlaid panels of the Agnus Dei (Lamb of God) and the Pelican. Above the altar the reredos is of Caen stone, and was carved by Thomas Earp. It shows in the centre the Crucifixion, flanked by panels showing Christ's agony in Gethsemane, and, on the other side, the Resurrection.<br /> <br /> The pulpit on the left was donated by Frances Walker of Foyers, convenor of the original Building Committee of the Cathedral. It was carved by the local firm of D. & A. Davidson in Caen stone and green Irish marble, supported on columns of granite from Abriachan (beside Loch Ness). The carved panels represent St Andrew preaching from his cross; the Good Shepherd; and St John the Baptist preaching in the wilderness.<br /> <br /> The organ seen here was the gift of Miss MacPherson-Grant of Aberlour. It was built by Hill & Son, London. The original instrument was rebuilt in 1928, but recently the cost of further rebuilding was so high that it had to be replaced by a modern digital organ.